November 26
On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 18:39:42 UTC, mipri wrote:
> It is not
> that these other conversations shouldn't happen but that the
> *focus* on them is a violation of something like Maslow's
> hierarchy of needs, but for programming languages.

Yes, exactly. Thanks for clearifying. :-)

November 26
On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 19:59:21 UTC, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
> Red is a good branding colour. Noticable and memorable. Yellow is a bit more noticable, but red is still very effective.
>
> Very successful in marketing as well: Coca Cola, etc.

Well, Coca Cola tries to address people who like risks. There red is the right colour. But think of a company who calmly decides between several languages. They don't want danger, they want something serious.
November 26
On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 20:03:27 UTC, bachmeier wrote:
> There are many comparisons with the experience provided by Go and Rust. Those languages had tremendous financial resources behind them.

From psychology I know, that it isn't a good idea to compare oneself to others. It's better to compare to one self. I don't know if this is true for programming languages too, but I guess it is. At least I would not compare D to these two languages, because they have large companies behind them, while D is community driven. And that's a huge difference.

November 26
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 09:11:33 UTC, S.G wrote:
> Fixing D bugs is a one way process so I don't even recommend doing this seriously, e.g on a daily basis, several hours per days. This will inexorably leads to frustration. Fix bugs if at work your company needs some particular fixes, fix bugs if you need some fixes for your own side-projects, fix bugs if this is required for your studies. But don't fix bugs just for the love of the D programming language.

I strongly disagree here. Fixing bugs is a little bit like doing the cleaning up. Of course you can start to clean your cooking pot just before you need it. But chances are, that at that time you've got not the time to do so. And additionally, fixing bugs also helps others.

Of course, if fixing bugs leads to frustration, then you shouldn't do it if you do not need to. But not all people are the same. For me it's often like solving sort of a mathematical problem and I feel happy, when I managed to do so. (And getting money for it might even be contraproductive in my case.)

And there is one more benefit for removing bugs early: Bugs in software tend to produce more bugs, because changes often have to work around old bugs and when the bug is fixed later, these places might become new bugs.

On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 09:24:19 UTC, S.G wrote:
> Unfortunately the gamification you describe is childish IMO. "a star next to the name in the forum", common I don't care that people think I'm a level 100. I prefer being an anonymous but efficient fixer that regularly gets 100 bucks for the work.

Again: People are different. If you may make people do the work for stars next to the name, you do not need to found the 100 bucks.
November 26
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 09:11:33 UTC, S.G wrote:
> On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 05:05:09 UTC, Jab wrote:
>> On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 16:53:43 UTC, berni44 wrote:
>>> a) Remove bugs
>>
>>
>> I feel this gets brought up a bit, how pull requests sit idle for years along with bug reports. People working on D work on whatever they want, fixing bugs and handling pull requests are just chores that no one wants to do.
>
> Fixing D bugs is a one way process so I don't even recommend doing this seriously, e.g on a daily basis, several hours per days. This will inexorably leads to frustration. Fix bugs if at work your company needs some particular fixes, fix bugs if you need some fixes for your own side-projects, fix bugs if this is required for your studies. But don't fix bugs just for the love of the D programming language.

I have fixed 150+ bugs and closed another 200+ (invalid or fixed) in the compiler and I can say that this is a great way to understand the innards of the software. Since documentation is scarce, fixing bugs is a fun way to understand (and document) what happens in either dmd, druntime or phobos and I encourage anyone who is interested in having an in depth understanding of the D compiler to pursue this endeavor.

Although the list of unresolved bugs is large I'm sure that aproximately 40% of them have been fixed in the meantime or are invalid, 40% are easy to fix, thus leaving only 20% that are more difficult to fix. This estimations are based on the distribution of bugs that I have encountered so far.
November 26
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 13:15:02 UTC, berni44 wrote:
> On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 19:59:21 UTC, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
>> Red is a good branding colour. Noticable and memorable. Yellow is a bit more noticable, but red is still very effective.
>>
>> Very successful in marketing as well: Coca Cola, etc.
>
> Well, Coca Cola tries to address people who like risks. There red is the right colour. But think of a company who calmly decides between several languages. They don't want danger, they want something serious.

I guess we just have to agree to diagree, red is a very common logo/profiling colour. But you are perhaps thinking of companies like IBM that use blue and black, which is very corporate and perhaps give an impression of something serious, but also very very boring. The original Microsoft logo was also pretty bad, but their colourful Windows logo was actually quite good. Same with Google, simple uplifting design (with red). Colourful logos are difficult to design, but I think they work better and are more memorable.

Anyway, the original name for D was Mars, so red makes sense for that reason alone. I personally prefer logos that retain the history.

Also I don't think a corporate profile is a good idea, because then expectations would be... a ready-made with no changes and little user activity.

But this is just bikeshedding anyway :) It probably doesn't matter much unless you target mainstream consumers.

November 27
On 27/11/2019 3:38 AM, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
> On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 13:15:02 UTC, berni44 wrote:
>> On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 19:59:21 UTC, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
>>> Red is a good branding colour. Noticable and memorable. Yellow is a bit more noticable, but red is still very effective.
>>>
>>> Very successful in marketing as well: Coca Cola, etc.
>>
>> Well, Coca Cola tries to address people who like risks. There red is the right colour. But think of a company who calmly decides between several languages. They don't want danger, they want something serious.
> 
> I guess we just have to agree to diagree, red is a very common logo/profiling colour. But you are perhaps thinking of companies like IBM that use blue and black, which is very corporate and perhaps give an impression of something serious, but also very very boring. The original Microsoft logo was also pretty bad, but their colourful Windows logo was actually quite good. Same with Google, simple uplifting design (with red). Colourful logos are difficult to design, but I think they work better and are more memorable.
> 
> Anyway, the original name for D was Mars, so red makes sense for that reason alone. I personally prefer logos that retain the history.
> 
> Also I don't think a corporate profile is a good idea, because then expectations would be... a ready-made with no changes and little user activity.
> 
> But this is just bikeshedding anyway :) It probably doesn't matter much unless you target mainstream consumers.

Color has different meanings in different cultures. This entire discussion is moot unless you specify which ;)
November 26
On 11/26/19 4:11 AM, S.G wrote:
> On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 05:05:09 UTC, Jab wrote:
>> On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 16:53:43 UTC, berni44 wrote:
>>> a) Remove bugs
>>
>>
>> I feel this gets brought up a bit, how pull requests sit idle for years along with bug reports. People working on D work on whatever they want, fixing bugs and handling pull requests are just chores that no one wants to do.
> 
> Fixing D bugs is a one way process so I don't even recommend doing this seriously, e.g on a daily basis, several hours per days. This will inexorably leads to frustration. Fix bugs if at work your company needs some particular fixes, fix bugs if you need some fixes for your own side-projects, fix bugs if this is required for your studies. But don't fix bugs just for the love of the D programming language.

Some weird people like fixing bugs for the fun of it. Don't tell me what not to do ;)

-Steve
November 26
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 14:50:00 UTC, rikki cattermole wrote:
> Color has different meanings in different cultures. This entire discussion is moot unless you specify which ;)

It is true that culture can modify biological perceptional responses, but colours, light intensity and patterns evoke emotional responses at a rather low level. On top of that you have the semiotics (the cultural customs or idioms if you will).

People like sunsets for a reason, it's time to stop up and change your activity, then return to your safe village as you don't get to see the predators after dark. It makes sense to feel at peace with blue, it is evening, save energy and find sleep (Microsoft used blue for software crashes...). It makes sense to enjoy green surroundings, you are more likely to find food there.

November 26
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 14:38:33 UTC, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
> On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 13:15:02 UTC, berni44 wrote:
>> On Monday, 25 November 2019 at 19:59:21 UTC, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
>>> Red is a good branding colour. Noticable and memorable. Yellow is a bit more noticable, but red is still very effective.
>>>
>>> Very successful in marketing as well: Coca Cola, etc.
>>
>> Well, Coca Cola tries to address people who like risks. There red is the right colour. But think of a company who calmly decides between several languages. They don't want danger, they want something serious.
>
> I guess we just have to agree to diagree, red is a very common

What is it you disagree with? Colours have been shown to invoke a general tendency towards specific emotional states. And red happens to tend towards danger (among other things). Evolutionarily, red is something you stay away from in nature.

(whether it matters significantly or not for a programming language I don't know, but it does it you want to get more tips, be rated higher visually, or perform worse/better on cogniitive tests)

Many research papers listed in this article if interested: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20140827-how-the-colour-red-warps-the-mind

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