Thread overview
LDC 1.7.0
Jan 06
kinke
Jan 06
Soulsbane
Jan 08
Joakim
5 hours ago
Johannes Loher
January 06
Hi everyone,

on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The highlights of this version in a nutshell:

* Based on D 2.077.1.
* Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
* LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

Full release log and downloads: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

Thanks to all contributors!
January 06
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
> Hi everyone,
>
> on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The highlights of this version in a nutshell:
>
> * Based on D 2.077.1.
> * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
> * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.
>
> Full release log and downloads: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0
>
> Thanks to all contributors!

Awesome! I need to get in touch with you, but I'm guessing noone@nowhere.com is a dead end :-) Please send something to aldacron@gmail.com. I'd like to talk about coordinating LDC release announcements on the blog.
January 06
Great, thank you very much!
And does LDC has the plan for release an AArch64/Linux version?


On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
> Hi everyone,
>
> on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The highlights of this version in a nutshell:
>
> * Based on D 2.077.1.
> * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
> * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.
>
> Full release log and downloads: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0
>
> Thanks to all contributors!


January 06
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
> Hi everyone,
>
> on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The highlights of this version in a nutshell:
>
> * Based on D 2.077.1.
> * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
> * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.
>
> Full release log and downloads: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0
>
> Thanks to all contributors!

Does anyone know if the ldc2 Snap is going to be updated. It is at 1.4.0 and snap refresh says no updates available. Thanks!
January 06
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
> Hi everyone,
>
> on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The highlights of this version in a nutshell:
>
> * Based on D 2.077.1.
> * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
> * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.
>
> Full release log and downloads: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0
>
> Thanks to all contributors!

I just dropped here to say that I have been considering Nim and D for a while and, to some extent, Rust. You are guys doing a great job shaping D for *real projects*, which is what I care about the most.

I think I will definitely go with D finally when I try an alternative to C++ (though C++ still remains my main language).

I still have to give it a serious try, but this is what made me convinced:

- a superior interoperability story (C and C++, Objective-C, Windows, now adding the C++ exception catching...). I cannot emphasize enough how important this is for me.
- a reasonable relearning and upgrade coming from C++.
- very powerful generative programming. I see that things like generating bindings for scripting languages and others have an edge with static introspection + mixins.
- more mature than Nim, at least at this point.
- want no gc? Ok, at least there is BetterC, so if I invest myself quite a bit on D (I am the kind of programmer that likes to squeeze power out of machines, so this always means that I will not consider VM languages), I will always have.


I hope I can give it a try with one (or two, to be decided) hobby projects I have been doing for a while. I will report the negative points also as I use it :p. By the way, and a bit off-topic for the post, but, if I want to port my code to run on Android/iOS, what is the recommended way?

1. create a shared library and consume it? Is that possible and smooth enough for ARM?



- easy to understand for
- a superior metaprogramming experience that is
January 07
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
> - want no gc? Ok, at least there is BetterC, so if I invest myself quite a bit on D (I am the kind of programmer that likes to squeeze power out of machines, so this always means that I will not consider VM languages), I will always have.

Also, it's perfectly possible to avoid most of the downsides of the GC (and keep some of the upsides) without worrying about BetterC. @nogc where you need it is great, BetterC is a much more extreme solution.
January 08
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
> negative points also as I use it :p. By the way, and a bit off-topic for the post, but, if I want to port my code to run on Android/iOS, what is the recommended way?
>
> 1. create a shared library and consume it? Is that possible and smooth enough for ARM?

Yes, that is the way native apps are invoked on Android, see the wiki for more info:

http://wiki.dlang.org/Build_D_for_Android

iOS support is in limbo, as a contributor got very far with it but hasn't had time for it lately.

January 08
On Monday, 8 January 2018 at 03:14:32 UTC, Joakim wrote:
> On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
>> negative points also as I use it :p. By the way, and a bit off-topic for the post, but, if I want to port my code to run on Android/iOS, what is the recommended way?
>>
>> 1. create a shared library and consume it? Is that possible and smooth enough for ARM?
>
> Yes, that is the way native apps are invoked on Android, see the wiki for more info:
>
> http://wiki.dlang.org/Build_D_for_Android
>
> iOS support is in limbo, as a contributor got very far with it but hasn't had time for it lately.

Thanks for the link!

January 08
On Sunday, 7 January 2018 at 12:22:17 UTC, John Colvin wrote:
> On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
>> - want no gc? Ok, at least there is BetterC, so if I invest myself quite a bit on D (I am the kind of programmer that likes to squeeze power out of machines, so this always means that I will not consider VM languages), I will always have.
>
> Also, it's perfectly possible to avoid most of the downsides of the GC (and keep some of the upsides) without worrying about BetterC. @nogc where you need it is great, BetterC is a much more extreme solution.

Yes, that is my guess also, but there are chances that I will be in these extreme situations myself, not for my pet projects, but for some embedded stuff I want to do. That is why I want something without runtime for microcontrollers at some point. Just to have the possibility open. For now I think I will stick to C++ for that (a subset) until I am confident D can do perfectly ok there. I know D is designed for that also (modulo GC and runtime) but I still need to see the practical, day to day problems if I use D for such a thing instead of C++, which I know quite well.
5 hours ago
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
> Hi everyone,
>
> on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The highlights of this version in a nutshell:
>
> * Based on D 2.077.1.
> * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
> * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.
>
> Full release log and downloads: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0
>
> Thanks to all contributors!

Hey, thanks for your great work! Would it be possible to add a armhf build to the release? If you can not do it yourself, could you please point me to some resources where I can find out about how to create such a release build myself? Thank you!