October 07
On Wednesday, 7 October 2020 at 01:27:17 UTC, claptrap wrote:
> On Tuesday, 6 October 2020 at 23:27:10 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe wrote:
>> On Tuesday, 6 October 2020 at 20:57:10 UTC, claptrap wrote:
>>> Im less interested in performance than I am in being able to express what I want to do in clear concise code.
>>
>> Give me an example of what you'd like to use type functions for.
>>
>> I betcha I can adapt it to current D with very few changes.
>
> I dont doubt it, but the question is could I do it? could a new D user do it?
>
> IE. Whats the learning curve like?
>
>
>> Take a look at this for example:
>>
>> ---
>> import std.algorithm;
>> template largestType(T...) {
>>         auto get() {
>>                 return reified!"a.sizeof".map!T
>>                     .sort!((a, b) => a > b).front; // or maxElement of course
>>         }
>>         alias largestType = T[get.idx];
>> }
>>
>> pragma(msg, largestType!(long, int, real, byte)); // real
>
> See the point is even even though I understand that, it took me a while to grep it, and I couldn't just rattle that off the top of my head, it'd take me a fair while to figure out how to do that. (Maybe i wouldn't even be able to on my own)
>
> But with Type Functions it'd be something like this...
>
> // assuming type is synonym for alias or whatever.
>
> type convTargets(type[] args)
> {
>     assert(args.length > 0);
>     type result = void; // IIRC void.sizeof == 1?
>     foreach(t; args)
>         if (t.size > result.sizeof) result = t;
>     return result;
> }
>
> The point is TF are obvious, if you know regular D code, you can use type functions. I've got the gist of it from a handful of forums posts. The cognitive load is so much lower.

Your code unfortunately won't work, because `= void`;
has special semantics, it won't assign the type void but leave the variable uninitialized.

This is what I wrote and it has shown me a bug.
alias variables should be initialized to an invalid type called, TError.
Inside the type-function implementation.
---
alias type = alias;

type biggestType(type[] types ...)
{
    type result;  // should initialize to Terror (The error type (the type that is not a type))
                  // for some reason initializes to alias now?
    foreach(t; types)
        if (t.sizeof > result.sizeof) result = t;
    return result;
}
// working around parser issues again.
// is expressions don't like function calls inside them ;)
alias I(alias A) = A;

pragma(msg, is(I!(biggestType()) == alias)); // prints true but really should not!
pragma(msg, is(I!(biggestType(int)) == int)); // prints true as it should
pragma(msg, is(I!(biggestType(int, ulong)) == int)); // prints false as it should
pragma(msg, is(I!(biggestType(int, ulong)) == ulong)); // prints true.


October 08
On Wednesday, 7 October 2020 at 22:31:52 UTC, Stefan Koch wrote:
> alias type = alias;
>
> type biggestType(type[] types ...)
> {
>     type result;  // should initialize to Terror (The error type (the type that is not a type))
>                   // for some reason initializes to alias now?
>     foreach(t; types)
>         if (t.sizeof > result.sizeof) result = t;
>     return result;
> }
> // working around parser issues again.
> // is expressions don't like function calls inside them ;)
> alias I(alias A) = A;
>
> pragma(msg, is(I!(biggestType()) == alias)); // prints true but really should not!

I just fixed this bug.
This will now print false.

the initial value of an alias variable is now ∅ The Empty type.
It's even less than void.

alias type = alias;

type TaliasInit()
{
    type x;
    assert(!is(x));
    return x;
}

pragma(msg, TaliasInit()); // prints ∅ (Empty Type)

October 09
On Thursday, 8 October 2020 at 20:52:29 UTC, Stefan Koch wrote:
> the initial value of an alias variable is now ∅ The Empty type.
Just for my understanding:
Is this empty type something you defined?
And would it be equivalent to the planned new bottom type (noreturn)?
October 09
On Friday, 9 October 2020 at 06:26:04 UTC, Dominikus Dittes Scherkl wrote:
> On Thursday, 8 October 2020 at 20:52:29 UTC, Stefan Koch wrote:
>> the initial value of an alias variable is now ∅ The Empty type.
> Just for my understanding:
> Is this empty type something you defined?
> And would it be equivalent to the planned new bottom type (noreturn)?

Thanks for asking.
Actually DMD already had it, in there it's known as in there Tnone.
It wasn't used for anything, I think it was supposed be the type of a not instantiated template ...

It's not bottom, because bottom is a type that a type function can return to you.
Tnone or ∅ (in D at least) just means this variable has not been assigned a type yet.
No type can implicitly convert to ∅.
October 09
On Friday, 9 October 2020 at 06:38:23 UTC, Stefan Koch wrote:
>
> Thanks for asking.
> Actually DMD already had it, in there it's known as in there Tnone.
> It wasn't used for anything, I think it was supposed be the type of a not instantiated template ...
>
I don't want to spread misinformation, it is actually used.
In dmd the classes have tag values so one does not have to do dynamic casts.
Tnone is used as tag for template parameter types which have been deduced, already.

It even has a mangle, but I doubt you should ever see it anywhere.
I will clarify with Walter.
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