June 23, 2005
I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.
June 23, 2005
zwang wrote:
> I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I'm coding a 3D game/engine with more than few thousand lines of code. It will probably also branch off into a commercial visualization program :)


-- 
Tomasz Stachowiak  /+ a.k.a. h3r3tic +/
June 23, 2005
zwang wrote:
> I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I've used it for a variety of purposes.  Mainly toy projects for now, but hopefully in the not-too-distant future I'll have some stuff worthy of releasing not just as SDWF demos.

Stewart.

-- 
My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox.  Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
June 23, 2005
In article <d9ej3v$2hpb$1@digitaldaemon.com>, zwang says...
>
>I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

Here's what I'm working on:

DSP - Server-side dyanmic servlet generation (Dynamic Servlet Pages).  Simliar to ColdFusion or PHP, DSP provides a tag syntax plus embedded D code, that renders your servlet script as compiled D on the server. http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsp

Watcher (new) - FTP Syncronization Utility. Sychronizes an arbitrary directory
with an FTP account in real-time, as the local filesystem changes. (A great
time-saver for web development)
http://www.dsource.org/projects/watcher

Both of these are Beta FOSS projects, and I take them quite seriously.  DSP has oodles of commercial potential for obvious reasons (no language interpreter or VM).  Watcher may well be destined to the average webdev toolbox; not a direct commercial impact, but its already saved me *tons* of time developing web sites.

Stuff that's on the back burner:
- An XML library with XMLNS, DOM3 and XPATH support (the parser is a part of DSP
right now).
- D to XML converter, suitable for doc generation (a modified DMDFE project).

Also, since Kris is on vacation, I'll plug in Mango for him.  I use Mango for both of the above projects.  It is far-and-away, the highest quality D library available today.  It certainly is a commercial-grade product.

Mango - Primarily an I/O library, Mango makes all kinds of tasks easy in D: client-server, TCP/IP, streams (conduits), file system manipulation, Unicode, XML, its all there.  Documentation and examples are available. http://www.dsource.org/projects/mango

I'm sure Kris has other stuff he's working on too. ;)

- EricAnderton at yahoo
June 23, 2005
zwang wrote:
> I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

As a better hobby language
http://svn.dsource.org/projects/warbots/web/index.html
June 23, 2005
zwang wrote:
> I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I am using it to write a framework for making applications that use OpenGL to render their interface. (http://dsource.org/projects/terra)

But, once I get Terra working well enough, I will be embarking on a really ambitious project that is intended to be commercial software. It's a mutlimedia production system with allot of my own inventions thrown into the basic functionality of many popular audio, video, and graphics programs.

-- 
Thanks,
Trevor Parscal
www.trevorparscal.com
trevorparscal@hotmail.com
June 24, 2005
zwang wrote:
> I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I have the Derelict project at dsource (http://www.dsource.org/projects/derelict/), which I'm currently using in 2 other projects:

* a game for a contest at gamedev.net
* a game framework I have dubbed WMD (the graphics portion being loosely based upon Dave Eberly's Wild Magic 3). I have finally settled on D as my language of choice for my little indie game company, and WMD will be the foundation for at least the first game I attempt to sell.
June 24, 2005
"zwang" <nehzgnaw@gmail.com> wrote in message news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1@digitaldaemon.com...
>I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I'm also writing a 3D game engine.  Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games.  But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :)

I also use D for just about everything.  It's a great text parsing language too.


June 24, 2005
Jarrett Billingsley wrote:
> "zwang" <nehzgnaw@gmail.com> wrote in message news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1@digitaldaemon.com...
> 
>>I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.
> 
> 
> I'm also writing a 3D game engine.  Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games.  But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :)
> 

Hmm, I see D is popular among gamedevers. It's looks like more than 1/5 of D users are gamedevers. I'm use it to write game engine too :).

I work in one of Russian gamedev company where I have to work with huge project in C++, I love it but with time it become bigger and bigger cesspit of code. And when I set to D on my spare time, I feel I get into small paradise :).


-- 
Victor (aka nail) Nakoryakov
nail-mail<at>mail<dot>ru

Krasnoznamensk, Moscow, Russia
June 24, 2005
Victor Nakoryakov wrote:
> Jarrett Billingsley wrote:
> 
>> "zwang" <nehzgnaw@gmail.com> wrote in message news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1@digitaldaemon.com...
>>
>>> I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.
>>
>>
>>
>> I'm also writing a 3D game engine.  Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games.  But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :)
>>
> 
> Hmm, I see D is popular among gamedevers. It's looks like more than 1/5 of D users are gamedevers. I'm use it to write game engine too :).
> 
> I work in one of Russian gamedev company where I have to work with huge project in C++, I love it but with time it become bigger and bigger cesspit of code. And when I set to D on my spare time, I feel I get into small paradise :).
> 
> 

I don't see why D appeals to game developers.
The unpredictable pauses of GC are unacceptable, aren't they?
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