October 19, 2005
Knud Sørensen wrote:
> I got: 
> 
> Your Score Summary
> 
> Overall, you scored as follows:
> 
> 1% scored higher (more nerdy), and
> 99% scored lower (less nerdy).
> 
> What does this mean? Your nerdiness is:
> 
> All hail the monstrous nerd. You are by far the SUPREME NERD GOD!!!
> 
> Finally the programme I wrote at age 15 to memories the periodical table paid off :-)

Why don't you write a program to perfect your score? :)
October 19, 2005
In article <dj4tdv$161h$1@digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
>
>> I got a 10%.  Not sure what I missed :-)
>
>I figured it out by hitting the back button and modifying the test results. I goofed the thing about what was the second question, and I also answered "10" for the number of planets, since it was reported recently that another was discovered <g>. I also got the dirt-in-the-hole answer wrong (slapping my forehead). Many of the questions had no effect on the score regardless of how they were answered.

Ah right.  I did miss the second question one.  I initially answered "10" on the planets as well then backed up and changed it just to see.  As for some questions not affecting the score, I noticed that while playing with the nerd test as well, but I figured some might be factors in determining the weight of a separate question.  Or perhaps patterns of answers are somehow considered for bonus points... though that sounds a tad complicated for a web quiz :-)


Sean


October 19, 2005
Sean Kelly wrote:
> In article <dj4tdv$161h$1@digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
> 
>>>I got a 10%.  Not sure what I missed :-)
>>
>>I figured it out by hitting the back button and modifying the test results.
>>I goofed the thing about what was the second question, and I also answered
>>"10" for the number of planets, since it was reported recently that another
>>was discovered <g>. I also got the dirt-in-the-hole answer wrong (slapping
>>my forehead). Many of the questions had no effect on the score regardless of
>>how they were answered.
> 
> 
> Ah right.  I did miss the second question one.  I initially answered "10" on the
> planets as well then backed up and changed it just to see.  As for some
> questions not affecting the score, I noticed that while playing with the nerd
> test as well, but I figured some might be factors in determining the weight of a
> separate question.  Or perhaps patterns of answers are somehow considered for
> bonus points... though that sounds a tad complicated for a web quiz :-)
> 
> 
> Sean
> 
> 

A übernerd should feel obliged to reverse engineer the formula! :-)
October 19, 2005
In article <dj5ose$26a9$1@digitaldaemon.com>, zwang says...
>
>Sean Kelly wrote:
>> In article <dj4tdv$161h$1@digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
>> 
>>>>I got a 10%.  Not sure what I missed :-)
>>>
>>>I figured it out by hitting the back button and modifying the test results. I goofed the thing about what was the second question, and I also answered "10" for the number of planets, since it was reported recently that another was discovered <g>. I also got the dirt-in-the-hole answer wrong (slapping my forehead). Many of the questions had no effect on the score regardless of how they were answered.
>> 
>> 
>> Ah right.  I did miss the second question one.  I initially answered "10" on the planets as well then backed up and changed it just to see.  As for some questions not affecting the score, I noticed that while playing with the nerd test as well, but I figured some might be factors in determining the weight of a separate question.  Or perhaps patterns of answers are somehow considered for bonus points... though that sounds a tad complicated for a web quiz :-)
>> 
>> 
>> Sean
>> 
>> 
>
>A übernerd should feel obliged to reverse engineer the formula! :-)

..and then proceed to immediately compose a superior solution, thus asserting one's nerdyness by making the older quiz look pathetic in comparison!

Seriously, it really should have been a question at the end:

"What do you think about this quiz?"
(o) Neat!
(o) I've seen better.
(o) I figured out how it works, and didn't need to know the answers.
(*) I've already thought out a better way to do it and plan on writing it.


A personal example: Back in Highschool CS, myself and a two other 'ubernerds' in the class found our way into demo programming.  It hit a point where we just kept trying to out-do each other's work, culminating in a sort of a tennis match of programming expertise.   Size, speed, memory footprint, effects and of course hacks were all traits to be admired... and outdone.  Oh, the things that can be done on a 286 and VGA registers!

.. it sure made our CS homework seem boring, that's for sure.

So yea, I think its essential to *need* to constantly establish a 'better way to go' if one truely walks the path of the nerd. ;)

- EricAnderton at yahoo
October 19, 2005
Right on, I was a Mode-X addict! I havent had as much fun since I was plugging VGA registers. Its funny - I met Abrash at Microsoft and acted like a giddy schoolgirl talking to him about how cool mode x was - he gave me this funny look and said "yah Im glad we dont have to do that crap anymore"

Kinda like santa claus telling you toys are lame.... :D



pragma wrote:
> A personal example: Back in Highschool CS, myself and a two other 'ubernerds' in
> the class found our way into demo programming.  It hit a point where we just
> kept trying to out-do each other's work, culminating in a sort of a tennis match
> of programming expertise.   Size, speed, memory footprint, effects and of course
> hacks were all traits to be admired... and outdone.  Oh, the things that can be
> done on a 286 and VGA registers!
> 
> ... it sure made our CS homework seem boring, that's for sure.
> 
> So yea, I think its essential to *need* to constantly establish a 'better way to
> go' if one truely walks the path of the nerd. ;)
> 
> - EricAnderton at yahoo
October 19, 2005
In article <dj5ose$26a9$1@digitaldaemon.com>, zwang says...
>
>A übernerd should feel obliged to reverse engineer the formula! :-)

An ubernerd with more free time perhaps ;-)  I got as far as discovering that different questions awarded different numbers of points and stopped.  Though I would be interested to know which of the questions had the largest impact on overall nerdiness.  I was thinking perhaps the photo recognition.


Sean


October 19, 2005
In article <dj5r2q$28e1$1@digitaldaemon.com>, pragma says...
>
>A personal example: Back in Highschool CS, myself and a two other 'ubernerds' in the class found our way into demo programming.  It hit a point where we just kept trying to out-do each other's work, culminating in a sort of a tennis match of programming expertise.   Size, speed, memory footprint, effects and of course hacks were all traits to be admired... and outdone.  Oh, the things that can be done on a 286 and VGA registers!

Ah, the good old days ;-)  That reminds me of a story that's been floating around the web for a long time now:

http://home.att.net/~rmestel/articles/real_programmers.txt


Sean


October 19, 2005
"Niko Korhonen" <niktheblak@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:dj52d4$1ck8$1@digitaldaemon.com...
> Walter Bright wrote:
> > The nerd test at http://www.nerdtests.com/ft_nq.php scores me at 90%, or "Supreme Nerd."
>
> I got 96%, or a SUPREME NERD GOD status. Methinks that this admirably high status is mostly due to my Hewlett-Packard pre-1990 RPN calculator, which usually scores extremely high at these nerd quizes.

I have my HP-16c on my desk, and use it regularly. I bought it new in the 80's, and am shocked at the prices it brings on Ebay. I still have my TI-SR-50A, but it no longer works.

> It also could be that I entered COBOL as "not a real programming language" :)

That was a no-brainer <g>.


October 19, 2005
On Wed, 19 Oct 2005 22:42:29 +0800, zwang wrote:

> Knud Sørensen wrote:
>> I got:
>> 
>> Your Score Summary
>> 
>> Overall, you scored as follows:
>> 
>> 1% scored higher (more nerdy), and
>> 99% scored lower (less nerdy).
>> 
>> What does this mean? Your nerdiness is:
>> 
>> All hail the monstrous nerd. You are by far the SUPREME NERD GOD!!!
>> 
>> Finally the programme I wrote at age 15 to memories the periodical table paid off :-)
> 
> Why don't you write a program to perfect your score? :)

No, coding where my old life now I have taken the red pill and is learning to rewrite reality while I am fighting the machines.

I got 100% on this matrix test: http://www.newstarget.com/gullibility.html

October 19, 2005
Yeah I LOVE that test, I got 100 too.

My favorite are "The Federal Reserve is a branch of the U.S. government." and "The fluoride added to drinking water is sourced from naturally-occurring fluoride mineral deposits."

ROFL - some people actually think this stuff!


Knud Sørensen wrote:
> 
> I got 100% on this matrix test:
> http://www.newstarget.com/gullibility.html
> 
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