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October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
"Kris" <fu@bar.com> wrote in message news:dj9ac6$d9n$1@digitaldaemon.com...
> Speaking of which ~ I received a truly outstanding hand-built guitar today
> [an Ed Roman QuickSilver, for those who know it]. A Cocobolo & Ebony
> work-of-art that Pragma would probably appreciate. I've always been
> intrigued by the relationship/overlap between music and programming ~ I
> mean, in my limited experience, it seems like engineers often have a noted
> musical interest. Anyone have an idea why that might be? Are musicians
> Nerdy?

Musical talent does correlate with nerdiness attributes in studies I've read
about. Interestingly, so does being a pilot, and a painter. My relatives all
seem to be pilots, painters, engineers, professors, etc. No athletes in the
lot. I'm doomed to be a nerd <g>.
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
In article <dj9ac6$d9n$1@digitaldaemon.com>, Kris says...
>
>Speaking of which ~ I received a truly outstanding hand-built guitar today 
>[an Ed Roman QuickSilver, for those who know it]. A Cocobolo & Ebony 
>work-of-art that Pragma would probably appreciate. 

You got that right. ;)

/drool

>I've always been 
>intrigued by the relationship/overlap between music and programming ~ I 
>mean, in my limited experience, it seems like engineers often have a noted 
>musical interest. Anyone have an idea why that might be? Are musicians 
>Nerdy? 

There's an undeniable link between the two, especially when it comes to us
programmers (especially in this newsgroup, as a long thread last year showed).
If you ask me, I really think it has to do with the role the right-brain plays
in how it shapes personality and the ability to handle abstract concepts.

- EricAnderton at yahoo
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
"Walter Bright" <newshound@digitalmars.com> wrote in message 
news:dj9lad$m5r$1@digitaldaemon.com...
>
> "Kris" <fu@bar.com> wrote in message 
> news:dj9ac6$d9n$1@digitaldaemon.com...
>> Speaking of which ~ I received a truly outstanding hand-built guitar 
>> today
>> [an Ed Roman QuickSilver, for those who know it]. A Cocobolo & Ebony
>> work-of-art that Pragma would probably appreciate. I've always been
>> intrigued by the relationship/overlap between music and programming ~ I
>> mean, in my limited experience, it seems like engineers often have a 
>> noted
>> musical interest. Anyone have an idea why that might be? Are musicians
>> Nerdy?
>
> Musical talent does correlate with nerdiness attributes in studies I've 
> read
> about. Interestingly, so does being a pilot, and a painter. My relatives 
> all
> seem to be pilots, painters, engineers, professors, etc. No athletes in 
> the
> lot. I'm doomed to be a nerd <g>.
>
>

I love music, especially classical guitar and piano (though I play very 
little). I enjoy long distance running. I even armwrestle competitively in 
North America (including once at a World's competition in Finland). I also 
enjoy programming and computers.  But for all that, I'm not exceptional in 
any of these areas, just sort of good.  And I'm certainly not an athlete, 
though locally people consider my brothers and I to be exceptionally fit ( 
he he... it's all relative... :-) )

But there are actually very few that can truly call themselves athletes. 
Those that do usually must dedicate a huge portion of their lives to 
achieving that moniker.  They become nerds of a different kind with very 
little to show for themselves in other aspects of their lives.  Being an 
athlete just requires that much work.

I have observed that people tend to admire /any/ skill that is rare whether 
it be athleticism, musical talent, or academic affinity.  In truth, I think 
what is most admirable is the willpower to succeed in an endeavor despite 
the odds.  Without the will, there is no way... regardless of talent or 
skill.

Ever heard somebody say, "Oh, he's got a huge potential" ?  That's statement 
is true about most people in almost any endeavor (granted some more than 
others).  Yet t'is useless praise if the individual has not the mindset to 
go with it.

Just some thoughts,

John Reimer

PS

I scored 88% on that silly nerd test!  And to think I no longer considered 
myself a nerd...  I must be gullible if I believed that ;-).
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
In article <dj9ac6$d9n$1@digitaldaemon.com>, Kris says...
>
>Speaking of which ~ I received a truly outstanding hand-built guitar today 
>[an Ed Roman QuickSilver, for those who know it]. A Cocobolo & Ebony 
>work-of-art that Pragma would probably appreciate. I've always been 
>intrigued by the relationship/overlap between music and programming ~ I 
>mean, in my limited experience, it seems like engineers often have a noted 
>musical interest. Anyone have an idea why that might be? Are musicians 
>Nerdy? 

Very nerdy.  Music theory is entirely built on mathematics, after all.  A friend
of mine who worked for Google is a huge music geek.  Last time I saw him he
spent a good portion of the time espousing the wonders of various scales and
note combinations.  That may be taking it to a bit of an extreme, but it's
certainly a testament to how geeky music can be if you want it to be.

I played bass guitar way back when--was in a band in high school and all.  In
college I ran out of people to play with and ended up selling my guitar to buy a
set of turntables and such.  It worked out rather well as my ear was always
better than my knack for guitar playing, though I do miss the guitar from time
to time.  Electronic gear isn't nearly as good for improvisation as traditional
musical instruments are.


Sean
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
In article <dj9lad$m5r$1@digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
>
>Musical talent does correlate with nerdiness attributes in studies I've read
>about. Interestingly, so does being a pilot, and a painter. My relatives all
>seem to be pilots, painters, engineers, professors, etc. No athletes in the
>lot. I'm doomed to be a nerd <g>.

A painter?  Interesting.  My wife is a painter.  That explains a lot.

By the way, she just told me that the relationship between music and mathematics
wass first proven by Pythagoras.  I suppose it's on the web somewhere :-)


Sean
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
In article <dj9ld7$mas$1@digitaldaemon.com>, pragma says...
>
>There's an undeniable link between the two, especially when it comes to us
>programmers (especially in this newsgroup, as a long thread last year showed).
>If you ask me, I really think it has to do with the role the right-brain plays
>in how it shapes personality and the ability to handle abstract concepts.

Walter mentioned piloting and painting as well, which--including music--are all
spatial arts to one degree or another.  I wonder if that has anything to do with
it.


Sean
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
In article <dj9ror$rp2$1@digitaldaemon.com>, John Reimer says...
>
>I have observed that people tend to admire /any/ skill that is rare whether 
>it be athleticism, musical talent, or academic affinity.  In truth, I think 
>what is most admirable is the willpower to succeed in an endeavor despite 
>the odds.  Without the will, there is no way... regardless of talent or 
>skill.
>
>Ever heard somebody say, "Oh, he's got a huge potential" ?  That's statement 
>is true about most people in almost any endeavor (granted some more than 
>others).  Yet t'is useless praise if the individual has not the mindset to 
>go with it.

I agree completely.  This actually reminded me of a scene from the movie
"Serenity" I saw recently, which seems appropriate.  The main character, Malcom,
is a man of strong convictions but little faith, and in discovering that he is
being pursued by an assassin a friend of his says "you can't defeat this man, he
is a believer."  Malcom misunderstands at first and thinks his friend means
faith, but the crux of the issue is that this assassin believes with absolute
conviction in the Rightness of his task, and that conviction makes him
unstoppable.


Sean
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
Jarrett Billingsley wrote:

> The funny thing is, even though I'm musically inclined, I can't come up with 
> a song to save my soul.  I find that in many areas of my life - I have 
> skills, but I'm not creative enough to come up with any way to apply them. 
> :( 

To be creative often demands a knowledge of underlying rules ~ in your 
example, song-writing rules. Those who aren't explicitly taught can find 
their own way through an inspiration of one kind or another. It's 
unlikely to be a lack of creativity, so don't kick yourself :)

I truly cannot sing and, perhaps because of that, don't write lyrics 
often enough to arrange a compelling story. Instead I use an instrument 
to weave the words. Of course, I'd be much happier if I could understand 
what it was saying to me ...
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
On Tue, 18 Oct 2005 23:01:32 +0300, Walter Bright wrote:
> The nerd test at http://www.nerdtests.com/ft_nq.php scores me at
> 90%, or "Supreme Nerd."

Eh. I tried to be extra-super non-nerdy and got a score of 97% .. Uff. :-)

--
Kai Backman, programmer, kai@shorthike.com
http://www.ShortHike.com - space station game
October 21, 2005
Re: Code of the Nerds
"John Reimer" <terminal.node@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:dj9ror$rp2$1@digitaldaemon.com...
> In truth, I think
> what is most admirable is the willpower to succeed in an endeavor despite
> the odds.  Without the will, there is no way... regardless of talent or
> skill.
>
> Ever heard somebody say, "Oh, he's got a huge potential" ?  That's
statement
> is true about most people in almost any endeavor (granted some more than
> others).  Yet t'is useless praise if the individual has not the mindset to
> go with it.

I quite agree with that. All talent does is open the door for you.
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