May 14, 2006
Check this out: http://www.unicode.org/policies/logo_policy.html

Sounds pretty heavy-handed.  If you wanted to use 'unicode' in the name of the module, it looks like it would have to be named:

	std/supportfortheunicode™standard.d

And yes, that ™ MUST be there (at least, they say it must).  This'd be
funny in the D docs:

"To use the D functions in support of the Unicode™ Standard, you should import the support for the Unicode™ Standard standard module like so:

	"import std.longAnnoyingJavaStyleNames.supportForTheUnicode" (Alt+0153)
"Standard;"

If you're not running Windows, then... umm... I dunno... use copy and paste?"

Whilst according to their own policy, the abbreviation "Uni-" is generic enough that it isn't protected by trademarks.  In that light, viva la "std.uni" :)

	-- Daniel

Sean Kelly wrote:
> Walter Bright wrote:
>>
>> std.uni isn't called std.unicode because unicode is trademarked.
> 
> It is?  *sigh*  People really need to stop doing that.
> 
> 
> Sean

-- 

v1sw5+8Yhw5ln4+5pr6OFma8u6+7Lw4Tm6+7l6+7D a2Xs3MSr2e4/6+7t4TNSMb6HTOp5en5g6RAHCP    http://hackerkey.com/
May 14, 2006
Daniel Keep wrote:
> Check this out: http://www.unicode.org/policies/logo_policy.html
> 
> Sounds pretty heavy-handed.  If you wanted to use 'unicode' in the name
> of the module, it looks like it would have to be named:
> 
> 	std/supportfortheunicode™standard.d
> 
> And yes, that ™ MUST be there (at least, they say it must).  This'd be
> funny in the D docs:
> 
> "To use the D functions in support of the Unicode™ Standard, you should
> import the support for the Unicode™ Standard standard module like so:
> 
> 	"import std.longAnnoyingJavaStyleNames.supportForTheUnicode" (Alt+0153)
> "Standard;"
> 
> If you're not running Windows, then... umm... I dunno... use copy and
> paste?"
> 
> Whilst according to their own policy, the abbreviation "Uni-" is generic
> enough that it isn't protected by trademarks.  In that light, viva la
> "std.uni" :)
> 
> 	-- Daniel
> 
> Sean Kelly wrote:
> 
>>Walter Bright wrote:
>>
>>>std.uni isn't called std.unicode because unicode is trademarked.
>>
>>It is?  *sigh*  People really need to stop doing that.
>>
>>
>>Sean
> 
> 

Surely you're taking this too literally. Both Windows and Linux are trademarked, and yet the std library uses those as module/file names.
May 14, 2006

John C wrote:
> Daniel Keep wrote:
>> Check this out: http://www.unicode.org/policies/logo_policy.html
>>
>> Sounds pretty heavy-handed.  If you wanted to use 'unicode' in the name of the module, it looks like it would have to be named:
>>
>>     std/supportfortheunicode™standard.d
>>
>> And yes, that ™ MUST be there (at least, they say it must).  This'd be
>> funny in the D docs:
>>
>> "To use the D functions in support of the Unicode™ Standard, you should import the support for the Unicode™ Standard standard module like so:
>>
>>     "import std.longAnnoyingJavaStyleNames.supportForTheUnicode"
>> (Alt+0153)
>> "Standard;"
>>
>> If you're not running Windows, then... umm... I dunno... use copy and paste?"
>>
>> Whilst according to their own policy, the abbreviation "Uni-" is generic enough that it isn't protected by trademarks.  In that light, viva la "std.uni" :)
>>
>>     -- Daniel
>>
>> Sean Kelly wrote:
>>
>>> Walter Bright wrote:
>>>
>>>> std.uni isn't called std.unicode because unicode is trademarked.
>>>
>>> It is?  *sigh*  People really need to stop doing that.
>>>
>>>
>>> Sean
>>
>>
> 
> Surely you're taking this too literally. Both Windows and Linux are trademarked, and yet the std library uses those as module/file names.

Very probably.  I *was* half-joking; but still, given what that page says, I'd go with 'uni' myself just to make absolutely sure.  Their trademark policy only seems to cover using their name in product descriptions, etc.  In any case, I think Walter made the right choice.

Incidentally, I never knew that Unicode had a logo.  Guess no one uses it because of the trademark stuff :P

Aah, intellectual property law is such fun...

	-- Daniel

-- 

v1sw5+8Yhw5ln4+5pr6OFma8u6+7Lw4Tm6+7l6+7D a2Xs3MSr2e4/6+7t4TNSMb6HTOp5en5g6RAHCP    http://hackerkey.com/
May 15, 2006
Walter Bright wrote:
<snip>
> std.uni isn't called std.unicode because unicode is trademarked.

I don't really see how you'd be infringing the trademark by simply using it as part of the name of a library module for Unicode support.

Is it really any different from products having names in the form "X for Windows"?

Stewart.

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My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox.  Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
May 15, 2006
Stewart Gordon wrote:
> Walter Bright wrote:
> <snip>
>> std.uni isn't called std.unicode because unicode is trademarked.
> 
> I don't really see how you'd be infringing the trademark by simply using it as part of the name of a library module for Unicode support.
> 
> Is it really any different from products having names in the form "X for Windows"?
> 
> Stewart.
> 

See: http://www.unicode.org/policies/logo_policy.html
May 15, 2006
Walter Bright wrote:
> Stewart Gordon wrote:
>> Walter Bright wrote:
>> <snip>
>>> std.uni isn't called std.unicode because unicode is trademarked.
>>
>> I don't really see how you'd be infringing the trademark by simply using it as part of the name of a library module for Unicode support.
>>
>> Is it really any different from products having names in the form "X for Windows"?
> 
> See: http://www.unicode.org/policies/logo_policy.html

Technically, I think modules names may be exempt as the language all concerns logos, documentation, and packaging.  But it's simply not worth the trouble, particularly for a standard library that others are expected to adopt.  I currently have a "std.unicode" module in Ares and plan to change it now that I know this.  Frankly, I find it exceedingly irritating that an open standard such as Unicode (tm) should have such restrictions, and I wish I could simply thumb my nose at them and adopt a different standard, but such is life.


Sean
May 17, 2006
In article <e4anei$2reb$2@digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
>
> <snip>
> std.uni isn't called std.unicode because unicode is trademarked.

But I think also UNI is:

http://www.uni.com/uni/controller/en/

:-)

Ciao

---
http://www.mariottini.net/roberto/
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