April 06, 2012
I would like to start writing little Win GUI utilities.  I really want to stick with single .exeS that I can carry around on a jump drive and don't have to install.  Is D developed enough, with various libraries and documentation to do this?  If there are still a lot of bugs and gotcha's maybe I should use the codeBlocks C++ IDE and go from there.  D just looks some much cleaner and has some features I've seen in Python dealing with strings especially.
April 06, 2012
On Friday, 6 April 2012 at 15:18:35 UTC, Paul wrote:
> I would like to start writing little Win GUI utilities.  I really want to stick with single .exeS that I can carry around on a jump drive and don't have to install.  Is D developed enough, with various libraries and documentation to do this?  If there are still a lot of bugs and gotcha's maybe I should use the codeBlocks C++ IDE and go from there.  D just looks some much cleaner and has some features I've seen in Python dealing with strings especially.

I can't recommend whether D should or shouldn't be used based on your description. You can build stand alone GUI apps with DFL, and probably DWT. QtD and GtkD likely need their libraries shipped around.

Documentation is pretty bad for DFL, but DWT has all the SWT docs and translation isn't bad.
April 07, 2012
On 2012-04-06 17:37, Jesse Phillips wrote:
> I can't recommend whether D should or shouldn't be used based on your
> description. You can build stand alone GUI apps with DFL, and probably
> DWT. QtD and GtkD likely need their libraries shipped around.
>
> Documentation is pretty bad for DFL, but DWT has all the SWT docs and
> translation isn't bad.

Building stand alone executables with DWT works great. DWT doesn't depend on any third party libraries, only on the system libraries.

-- 
/Jacob Carlborg
April 07, 2012
On Saturday, 7 April 2012 at 12:25:27 UTC, Jacob Carlborg wrote:
> On 2012-04-06 17:37, Jesse Phillips wrote:

> Building stand alone executables with DWT works great. DWT doesn't depend on any third party libraries, only on the system libraries.

I downloaded and installed dinstaller.exe using this HowTo:
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSugYSC5hrE&feature=related
What would I need to have installed to run DWT?
How about VisualD, is it any good?
Any recommends would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks...vmars
April 08, 2012
On 2012-04-07 23:34, vmars316 wrote:
> On Saturday, 7 April 2012 at 12:25:27 UTC, Jacob Carlborg wrote:
>> On 2012-04-06 17:37, Jesse Phillips wrote:
>
>> Building stand alone executables with DWT works great. DWT doesn't
>> depend on any third party libraries, only on the system libraries.
>
> I downloaded and installed dinstaller.exe using this HowTo:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSugYSC5hrE&feature=related
> What would I need to have installed to run DWT?

1. Clone this git repository: https://github.com/d-widget-toolkit/dwt
2. Pull down the submodules "base" and "org.eclipse.swt.win32.win32.x86" by running:

$ git submodule init
$ git submodule update

3. Build the library by running:

$ rake base swt

Ruby and rake is needed for the above command. Or the source code can be used directly. Both "base" and "swt" is needed.

These import libraries are also needed (for some things):

> How about VisualD, is it any good?
> Any recommends would be greatly appreciated.
> Thanks...vmars

I've heard it's good, but I haven't used it myself.

-- 
/Jacob Carlborg
April 16, 2012
On Sunday, 8 April 2012 at 10:26:10 UTC, Jacob Carlborg wrote:
> On 2012-04-07 23:34, vmars316 wrote:
>> On Saturday, 7 April 2012 at 12:25:27 UTC, Jacob Carlborg wrote:
>>> On 2012-04-06 17:37, Jesse Phillips wrote:
>>
>>> Building stand alone executables with DWT works great. DWT doesn't
>>> depend on any third party libraries, only on the system libraries.
>>
>> I downloaded and installed dinstaller.exe using this HowTo:
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSugYSC5hrE&feature=related
>> What would I need to have installed to run DWT?
>
> 1. Clone this git repository: https://github.com/d-widget-toolkit/dwt
> 2. Pull down the submodules "base" and "org.eclipse.swt.win32.win32.x86" by running:
>
> $ git submodule init
> $ git submodule update
>
> 3. Build the library by running:
>
> $ rake base swt
>
> Ruby and rake is needed for the above command. Or the source code can be used directly. Both "base" and "swt" is needed.
>
> These import libraries are also needed (for some things):
>
>> How about VisualD, is it any good?
>> Any recommends would be greatly appreciated.
>> Thanks...vmars
>
> I've heard it's good, but I haven't used it myself.

Is installing and using DWT really this involved?  I spent hours figuring out github, cloning the repository (I think).  The git submodule commands never ran w/o errors.  I was quite frustrated.
Thanks for any additional comments.  Do you know of a tutorial that deals with this installation and goes through a basic DWT hello world....all in on tutorial?

April 16, 2012
On 2012-04-16 19:04, Paul wrote:

> Is installing and using DWT really this involved? I spent hours figuring
> out github, cloning the repository (I think). The git submodule commands
> never ran w/o errors. I was quite frustrated.
> Thanks for any additional comments. Do you know of a tutorial that deals
> with this installation and goes through a basic DWT hello world....all
> in on tutorial?

No, as far as I know there is no such tutorial. But when you have downloaded DWT you could use tutorials for SWT with minor modifications.

Cloning the repository is just:

$ git clone git://github.com/d-widget-toolkit/dwt.git

Then you run the commands for the submodules.

-- 
/Jacob Carlborg
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