August 02, 2010
It makes sense now. Thanks. :)

Steven Schveighoffer Wrote:

> On Sat, 31 Jul 2010 23:10:05 -0400, Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > Oh and I'm getting the same issue in Python when using CR only. I don't know why I have the CR option in the text editor if it doesn't work properly. I guess CR is used on the Macs maybe..?
> >
> > Andrej Mitrovic Wrote:
> >
> >> I'm getting normal newlines here (XP):
> >>
> >> C:\output>test.exe
> >> import std.file: readText;
> >> import std.stdio: write;
> >> void main() {
> >>     string s = readText("test.d");
> >>     write(s);
> >> }
> >>
> >> The text used CR+LF newlines. I also tried them using LF newlines, which worked fine. But I've then tried with CR and that gives out weird output like so:
> >>
> >> }   write(s);= readText("test.d");
> 
> CR means carriage return.  This is for old-style line printers.  When you sent a CR, it means, literally, move the carriage back to the front of the line.  When you sent a LF (line feed), it means, feed the paper another line.
> 
> If you printed a file to such a printer with just line feeds, you would see:
> 
> import std.file: readText;
>                            import std.stdio: write;
>                                                    void main() {
> ...
> 
> 
> If you printed the file with just CRs, you would see all the lines super-imposed over eachother, because the paper is never moved, just the carriage is returned.
> 
> This is the effect you are seeing, each line is super-imposed over the other.  However, on a terminal, you don't see the residual letters from previously printed lines, they are completely overwritten.
> 
> Essentially, if you put in a sleep between printing each line, what you'd see is this:
> 
> import std.file: readText;
> 
> .. pause ..
> 
> import std.stdio: write;t;
> 
> .. pause ..
> 
> void main() {dio: write;t;
> 
> ....
> 
> Hope this helps ;)
> 
> -Steve

August 03, 2010
== Quote from bearophile (bearophileHUGS@lycos.com)'s article
> I think there is a bug here, but can you please try it a bit?
> The name of this program is "test.d", so it loads its souce code:
> import std.file: readText;
> import std.stdio: write;
> void main() {
>     string s = readText("test.d");
>     write(s);
> }
> On windows the output is:
> import std.file: readText;
> import std.stdio: write;
> void main() {
>     string s = readText("test.d");
>     write(s);
> }
> So it shows extra newlines (on Windows newlines are two chars).
> On Windows a similar Python program doesn't show the doubled newlines:
> s = open("test.d").read()
> print s
> Bye,
> bearophile

By the way, your code works correctly on my computer.  I ran the program in cygwin using a bash shell under Windows XP.  What doesn't work correctly in this setup is writef() followed by user input.  I need to add stdout.flush() after writef.

So go figure...



$ dmd --help
Digital Mars D Compiler v2.047
Copyright (c) 1999-2010 by Digital Mars written by Walter Bright
Documentation: http://www.digitalmars.com/d/2.0/index.html





$ ./readlines.exe
import std.file: readText;
import std.stdio: write;

void main() {
  string s = readText( "readlines.d");
  write(s);
}




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