February 01, 2011
If I have an enum of chars, and I have a variable that contains a generic char, I may want to convert the second to an instance of the first one, safely (a normal cast is enough to do it unsafely). Is it a good idea to give this purpose to to!() (this idea is currently not implemented)?


import std.conv: to;
enum Foo : char { a = 'A', b = 'B' }
void main() {
    Foo r1 = cast(Foo)'A'; // OK
    Foo r2 = cast(Foo)'X'; // error undetected
    Foo r3 = to!Foo('A');  // OK
    Foo r4 = to!Foo('X');  // error detected
}

Bye,
bearophile
February 01, 2011
bearophile Wrote:

> If I have an enum of chars, and I have a variable that contains a generic char, I may want to convert the second to an instance of the first one, safely (a normal cast is enough to do it unsafely). Is it a good idea to give this purpose to to!() (this idea is currently not implemented)?

I believe this is exactly what std.conv.to should do. It should be the safest and recommended way to do conversions.

I have a request in for preventing removal of qualifiers: http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=5307

February 02, 2011
Jesse Phillips:

> I believe this is exactly what std.conv.to should do. It should be the safest and recommended way to do conversions.

http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=5515

Bye,
bearophile
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