May 18, 2012
I remember back when we were considering whether to move DMD, Phobos and druntime from SVN on DSource to Git on GitHub, there were some concerns about using Git on Windows.  People claimed that Git was a very Linux-centric tool, and that Windows support was buggy at best.

Still, we made the switch, and I haven't really registered that many complaints since.  So now I'm curious:  Windows users, have you just resigned, or did Git actually turn out to work well on Windows?  Specifically, is it usable from the CMD command line, and are graphical front-ends such as TortoiseGit any good?  (I know running it through Cygwin works well, but that doesn't count.)

-Lars
May 18, 2012
I couldn't git it working at first, but it wasn't too bad when it finally worked. :P


Mainly, what you need is for someone to spend 15 minutes and explain to you how the push/pull/commit/etc. model works, how many stores/repositories are there and why, etc... when a friend of mine did that, it was easy enough to understand (though doing it with git-bash is still annoying).
May 18, 2012
Are you happy with Windows? :-P
May 18, 2012
On 18/05/12 09:58, Lars T. Kyllingstad wrote:
> Still, we made the switch, and I haven't really registered that many complaints
> since. So now I'm curious: Windows users, have you just resigned, or did Git
> actually turn out to work well on Windows?

I'm mostly a Linux-user, but I have played with Git on Windows and don't recall it being particularly different from the Linux experience.  I'd have thought the main issue would be that Windows-oriented people aren't used to using command-line stuff (in my experience this can extend to devs as well as regular users).
May 18, 2012
In my experience, TortoiseGIT is rather awkward to use. Anyone looking for a GUI for git should have a look at SmartGIT. It is commercial but zero cost for non-commercial use, available for Win/Mac/Linux and I don't know any other GUI that comes even close in quality.

I guess there will always be some expert operations that require using the git CLI. This is just as usable on Windows as it is on Unix, but Windows users tend to avoid CLI in general. Anyhow, a user who migrates from SVN to GIT would not even miss that kind of operations.

In general I don't see any aspect where GIT is less adapted to Windows than any other version control.



On 18.05.2012 09:58, Lars T. Kyllingstad wrote:
> I remember back when we were considering whether to move DMD, Phobos and
> druntime from SVN on DSource to Git on GitHub, there were some concerns
> about using Git on Windows. People claimed that Git was a very
> Linux-centric tool, and that Windows support was buggy at best.
>
> Still, we made the switch, and I haven't really registered that many
> complaints since. So now I'm curious: Windows users, have you just
> resigned, or did Git actually turn out to work well on Windows?
> Specifically, is it usable from the CMD command line, and are graphical
> front-ends such as TortoiseGit any good? (I know running it through
> Cygwin works well, but that doesn't count.)
>
> -Lars

May 18, 2012
On 5/18/2012 4:58 PM, Lars T. Kyllingstad wrote:
> I remember back when we were considering whether to move DMD, Phobos and
> druntime from SVN on DSource to Git on GitHub, there were some concerns
> about using Git on Windows. People claimed that Git was a very
> Linux-centric tool, and that Windows support was buggy at best.
>
> Still, we made the switch, and I haven't really registered that many
> complaints since. So now I'm curious: Windows users, have you just
> resigned, or did Git actually turn out to work well on Windows?
> Specifically, is it usable from the CMD command line, and are graphical
> front-ends such as TortoiseGit any good? (I know running it through
> Cygwin works well, but that doesn't count.)
>
> -Lars

I use it through Git Bash, which is part of the Git for Windows[1] package and isn't much different from a Linux command line. Once I got a grip on the basic git commands, I've had no problems with it at all. In fact, I actually cringe when I have to go back to subversion now and again.

[1] http://msysgit.github.com/
May 18, 2012
Am 18.05.2012 09:58, schrieb Lars T. Kyllingstad:
> I remember back when we were considering whether to move DMD,
> Phobos and druntime from SVN on DSource to Git on GitHub, there
> were some concerns about using Git on Windows.  People claimed
> that Git was a very Linux-centric tool, and that Windows support
> was buggy at best.

SmartGit is the best

May 18, 2012
I'm windows exclusive, and I like git. I recently switched most of my personal projects to git from svn, I'm generally enjoying using git a lot more these days.

Command line works fine, although windows users don't like to do that.
TortoiseGit works, it's alright. I use it for most tasks, and the command
line for things Tortoise doesn't have buttons for (a surprising number of
trivial tasks).
As a windows user, git is not a problem anymore.

On 18 May 2012 10:58, Lars T. Kyllingstad <public@kyllingen.net> wrote:

> I remember back when we were considering whether to move DMD, Phobos and druntime from SVN on DSource to Git on GitHub, there were some concerns about using Git on Windows.  People claimed that Git was a very Linux-centric tool, and that Windows support was buggy at best.
>
> Still, we made the switch, and I haven't really registered that many
> complaints since.  So now I'm curious:  Windows users, have you just
> resigned, or did Git actually turn out to work well on Windows?
>  Specifically, is it usable from the CMD command line, and are graphical
> front-ends such as TortoiseGit any good?  (I know running it through Cygwin
> works well, but that doesn't count.)
>
> -Lars
>


May 18, 2012
On 18 May 2012 11:38, Ary Manzana <ary@esperanto.org.ar> wrote:

> Are you happy with Windows? :-P
>

Completely.


May 18, 2012
On Fri, May 18, 2012 at 7:07 PM, Manu <turkeyman@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 18 May 2012 11:38, Ary Manzana <ary@esperanto.org.ar> wrote:
>
>> Are you happy with Windows? :-P
>>
>
> Completely.
>

I am too. Also I like to be able to program in any OS and then compile on any too. I don't mind differences as far as I can work... and play.

git on windows now is less worst than before but as mentionned here it is still awkward to us, without specific reasons on the top of my head.

So far I use only Mercurial when I have choice.
That said, knowing the subtile differences between the two, I'm still open
to use git on non-windows projects I have.

I think I will try fossil on some pet projects too.

Joel Lamotte


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