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February 13, 2012
Re: newbie -- how to build module?
On 2/13/12, Alf P. Steinbach <alf.p.steinbach+usenet@gmail.com> wrote:
> By the way, I see that the list of functions provided by
> core.sys.windows.windows is rather short, covering a very small fraction
> of the API:
>
> How would one go about extending that?

http://dsource.org/projects/bindings/wiki/WindowsApi

Windows samples which use that library can be found here:
https://github.com/AndrejMitrovic/DWinProgramming
February 13, 2012
Re: newbie -- how to build module?
Hi,

On 13.02.2012 08:45, Alf P. Steinbach wrote:
> I first started with a Windows message box program and installing an
> IDE. I'm now using the VisualD plug-in with the Visual Studio 10 Shell,
> after battling a bit with installation of service pack 1 for Visual
> Studio. VisualD works, sort of, except the devs forgot that the resource
> compiler needs an INCLUDE variable so that it finds <windows.h>, so,
> silly as it is, the VisualD plugin can't be used directly as-is to
> create a modern look and feel Windows program. I solved it by running
> Visual Studio from the command line.

There is the global option "Resource includes" in 
Tools->Options->Projects and Solutions->Visual D Directories.

Rainer
February 13, 2012
Re: newbie -- how to build module?
On 2/13/2012 6:15 AM, Alf P. Steinbach wrote:
> Are there group charters?

Not much beyond the descriptions here:

  http://digitalmars.com/NewsGroup.html

We're pretty informal.

> As a newbie one tries things and asks about things that a person more accustomed
> to The Usual Ways(TM) just discounts immediately without further reflection --
> missing out on the opportunities...

That's true, we often do not see things the way a new user would.

> OK. So, since I don't know anything about how to "submit additions back
> upstream", I just enclose it here.

The most effective way to contribute code is to fork/pull on github for the 
following project:

  https://github.com/D-Programming-Language

Bug reports go here:

  http://d.puremagic.com/issues/

The trouble with newsgroup postings of code is as time goes by, the posting 
scrolls off the radar.
February 13, 2012
Re: newbie -- how to build module?
On 2/13/2012 4:32 AM, Alf P. Steinbach wrote:
> It's the name of the module generated by the program, just more clean aliases
> for the Unicode based Windows API functions -- e.g., in C++ one would write
> `MessageBox`, not `MessageBoxW`, so I alias them.

The Windows .h files are set up so that MessageBox is a macro that resolves to 
MessageBoxW or MessageBoxA depending on another macro setting. I've never liked 
that practice - preferring to call the desired function explicitly (whether that 
is dirty or clean is not of much import, it is what it is as Microsoft saw fit 
to name it).
February 13, 2012
Re: newbie -- how to build module?
On Monday, 13 February 2012 at 19:27:39 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:
> On 2/13/2012 6:15 AM, Alf P. Steinbach wrote:
>> Are there group charters?
>
> Not much beyond the descriptions here:
>
>  http://digitalmars.com/NewsGroup.html
>
> We're pretty informal.

I read that last word as 'normal' and was about to make an 
objection. :P
February 13, 2012
Re: newbie -- how to build module?
On 13.02.2012 19:52, Rainer Schuetze wrote:
> Hi,
>
> On 13.02.2012 08:45, Alf P. Steinbach wrote:
>> I first started with a Windows message box program and installing an
>> IDE. I'm now using the VisualD plug-in with the Visual Studio 10 Shell,
>> after battling a bit with installation of service pack 1 for Visual
>> Studio. VisualD works, sort of, except the devs forgot that the resource
>> compiler needs an INCLUDE variable so that it finds <windows.h>, so,
>> silly as it is, the VisualD plugin can't be used directly as-is to
>> create a modern look and feel Windows program. I solved it by running
>> Visual Studio from the command line.
>
> There is the global option "Resource includes" in
> Tools->Options->Projects and Solutions->Visual D Directories.

Thanks. Checking it out now, I found it, and it was set to

  $(WindowsSdkDir)\include;$(DevEnvDir)..\..\VC\include

where WindowsSdkDir is an environment variable that isn't defined by the 
SDK installation (so isn't present with normal start of Visual Studio), 
but is set by the common environment fix batch file.

However, adding the raw SDK include path to that option did not work, 
while running Visual Studio Shell from the command line (with the 
environment variables set properly) does work.

Cheers,

- Alf
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