March 30
On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 02:55:27 UTC, James Blachly wrote:
>> "A visible team can be seen and @mentioned by every member of this organization."
>
> Does this [hiding to non org members] really help D's visibility and adoption? What sorts of things are discussed that do not benefit from openness? For example, I am a bona fide scientist using Dlang, but had no idea dlang-science was even an active group (I was aware of the org, and repos, but assumed it was not very active)

Hi James

I'll second your sentiment.  I'm a mission support programmer on various space missions and would like to see what's discussed in dlang-science.  It appears that D has a lot to offer programmers in my field.  Like everyone else our data volumes are insane (ex: 2.4 TB for a 6 hour ground radio astronomy observation).  D's performance combined with it's garbage collector are valuable in my line of work since everyone's python/matlab/idl code is grinding to a relative halt.

I could switch to Java and JNI since it would mesh well with other tools we support, but for now I'm trying out D, and would like to stay and gain competence in this elegant language.

Other than rudely posting an issue @ https://github.com/DlangScience/NetCDF-D, does anyone know the right way to start a conversation with DlangScience?  I'm trying to blend in and learn this community's norms.

--
Chris


March 30
On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 04:34:48 UTC, rikki cattermole wrote:
> As far as I know its not actively used. Both teams and the discussion feature Github offers them.
>
> And yes I did try to make it public, that wasn't an option.

Hi Rikki

Thank you for trying to make it public, it's appreciated.

--
Chris

March 30
On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 07:51:17 UTC, Chris Piker wrote:
> Other than rudely posting an issue @ https://github.com/DlangScience/NetCDF-D, does anyone know the right way to start a conversation with DlangScience?  I'm trying to blend in and learn this community's norms.

try also:

https://github.com/dlang-community/discussions/issues

But there is not much going on in DlangScience, right now there is no real package maintained. The dlang-community intention is to maintain *orphaned* but useful packages.

E.g. one of the most popular package libmir is not in DlangScience at all:

https://github.com/libmir/mir-algorithm
https://github.com/libmir


So https://code.dlang.org/ is the main place for packages, science or not.

March 30
On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 17:40:15 UTC, mw wrote:
> On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 07:51:17 UTC, Chris Piker wrote:
> https://github.com/dlang-community/discussions/issues
>
> But there is not much going on in DlangScience, right now there is no real package maintained. The dlang-community intention is to maintain *orphaned* but useful packages.

Good to know you're out there providing continuity.

Since I'm not orphaning packages soon and since physical science packages have a relatively small user base, it sounds like interaction with the dlang-community group is not recommended at this time.

> E.g. one of the most popular package libmir is not in DlangScience at all:
>
> https://github.com/libmir/mir-algorithm
> https://github.com/libmir

Good point. Though as a D core library I wouldn't expect it find it among a run-of-the-mill science repository collection.

> So https://code.dlang.org/ is the main place for packages, science or not.

Okay, got it. Repositories are scattered, and that's okay, because packages are centralized.

March 31
On 31/03/2021 7:28 AM, Chris Piker wrote:
> Since I'm not orphaning packages soon and since physical science packages have a relatively small user base, it sounds like interaction with the dlang-community group is not recommended at this time.

It is neither not recommended, nor recommended.

Get something solid that people want to use, then it doesn't matter about how many people are available to maintain it.

Dlang-Community exists primarily as a backup in case of the original owners disappear (doesn't matter why, could just by life and only be gone for a year or two).

See: https://github.com/dlang-community/discussions
April 01
On Wednesday, 31 March 2021 at 03:24:37 UTC, rikki cattermole wrote:
> On 31/03/2021 7:28 AM, Chris Piker wrote:
> Get something solid that people want to use, then it doesn't matter about how many people are available to maintain it.

This is good advice.  I'm probably too used to organizations and not reputations.  Will worry about the code first.

By the way for anyone who has been following along, the repository itself has been moved to my personal account.  I see no reason to move it again soon.

https://github.com/cpiker/deimos.cdf


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