September 13
I made some research about returning multiple values from a function as it is done in dynamic languages, and there is no clear was as far as I can see.

So an idea came to me, and I would like to share it with you. Maybe this could be turned into a proposal.

Let's say I have defined a function and its return type is set to "auto".

	auto test()
	{
		return struct(
			name = "Adam",
			country: string = "Denmark",
			age: ubyte = 37
		);
	}

Compiler would define an automatically generated struct into code that exactly fits to the returned struct. When I call the above function as below,

	auto info = test();

Type of the variable "info" is going to be that automatically generated struct, and values of the returned struct are going to be copied into it.

The only thing that is different in this approach compared to returning a normal struct variable is that there is no need to define a struct type explicitly and it is done by the compiler, the rest is same, but with much cleaner syntax.
September 13
On Sunday, 13 September 2020 at 10:26:21 UTC, tcak wrote:
> Let's say I have defined a function and its return type is set to "auto".
>
> 	auto test()
> 	{
> 		return struct(
> 			name = "Adam",
> 			country: string = "Denmark",
> 			age: ubyte = 37
> 		);
> 	}
>
> Compiler would define an automatically generated struct into code that exactly fits to the returned struct. When I call the above function as below,
>
> 	auto info = test();
>
> Type of the variable "info" is going to be that automatically generated struct, and values of the returned struct are going to be copied into it.

Isn't this exactly what Tuple already does? The only difference is that the struct is generated by a template in the standard library, and not by the compiler.