July 04, 2012
0.writeln();
01.writeln();
etc...

Throw up a series of errors while any other number as the leading digit seems to work fine. Why is this?


July 04, 2012
On Wednesday, July 04, 2012 02:20:26 ixid wrote:
> 0.writeln();

This works.

> 01.writeln();

This doesn't.

> etc...
> 
> Throw up a series of errors while any other number as the leading digit seems to work fine. Why is this?

It's probably an artifact of getting rid of octal literals and is clearly a bug - though you probably shouldn't be starting literals with 0 due to possible confusion with octal literals anyway (00 - 07 are permitted because they're the same in both octal and decimal, but any other number literal starting with 0 is illegal).

The error you get for something like

auto n = 08;

is a bit off too

q.d(5): Error: semicolon expected following auto declaration, not '8'

- Jonathan M Davis
July 04, 2012
On Tuesday, July 03, 2012 17:34:21 Jonathan M Davis wrote:
> On Wednesday, July 04, 2012 02:20:26 ixid wrote:
> > 0.writeln();
> 
> This works.
> 
> > 01.writeln();
> 
> This doesn't.
> 
> > etc...
> > 
> > Throw up a series of errors while any other number as the leading digit seems to work fine. Why is this?
> 
> It's probably an artifact of getting rid of octal literals and is clearly a bug - though you probably shouldn't be starting literals with 0 due to possible confusion with octal literals anyway (00 - 07 are permitted because they're the same in both octal and decimal, but any other number literal starting with 0 is illegal).
> 
> The error you get for something like
> 
> auto n = 08;
> 
> is a bit off too
> 
> q.d(5): Error: semicolon expected following auto declaration, not '8'

Now reported:

http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=8345 http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=8346

- Jonathan M Davis
July 04, 2012
> 0.writeln();
>
> This works.

It doesn't with 2.058, are we using different versions? Thanks for adding it to the bug list, I am not knowledgeable enough about D to judge if something is a bug or if I've just not understood it.


July 04, 2012
On Wednesday, July 04, 2012 03:48:52 ixid wrote:
> > 0.writeln();
> > 
> > This works.
> 
> It doesn't with 2.058, are we using different versions? Thanks for adding it to the bug list, I am not knowledgeable enough about D to judge if something is a bug or if I've just not understood it.

2.059 is the latest release (and is already nearly 3 months old), but I'm using the latest from github, so I don't know what 2.059 does.

- Jonathan M Davis
July 04, 2012
I think I'm using 2.059 actually.


July 04, 2012
On Wednesday, 4 July 2012 at 01:53:40 UTC, Jonathan M Davis wrote:
> On Wednesday, July 04, 2012 03:48:52 ixid wrote:
>> > 0.writeln();
>> > 
>> > This works.
>> 
>> It doesn't with 2.058, are we using different versions? Thanks
>> for adding it to the bug list, I am not knowledgeable enough
>> about D to judge if something is a bug or if I've just not
>> understood it.
>
> 2.059 is the latest release (and is already nearly 3 months old), but I'm
> using the latest from github, so I don't know what 2.059 does.
>
> - Jonathan M Davis

The problem was fixed in 2.060head.
http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=8252

Kenji Hara
July 04, 2012
On Wednesday, 4 July 2012 at 00:34:39 UTC, Jonathan M Davis wrote:
> On Wednesday, July 04, 2012 02:20:26 ixid wrote:
>> 0.writeln();
>
> This works.
>
>> 01.writeln();
>
> This doesn't.
>
>> etc...
>> 
>> Throw up a series of errors while any other number as the leading
>> digit seems to work fine. Why is this?
>
> It's probably an artifact of getting rid of octal literals and is clearly a
> bug - though you probably shouldn't be starting literals with 0 due to
> possible confusion with octal literals anyway (00 - 07 are permitted because
> they're the same in both octal and decimal, but any other number literal
> starting with 0 is illegal).
>
> The error you get for something like
>
> auto n = 08;
>
> is a bit off too
>
> q.d(5): Error: semicolon expected following auto declaration, not '8'
>
> - Jonathan M Davis

The one exception I found to starting literals with 0 is when using dates - using the DateTime module (excellent write-up, btw!) and having to pass dates like 07/04/09 as 7, 4, 9 without the leading 0 is kind of awkward, for me at least. Minor gripe.
July 04, 2012
On Thursday, July 05, 2012 01:44:19 Jonathan Andrew wrote:
> The one exception I found to starting literals with 0 is when using dates - using the DateTime module (excellent write-up, btw!) and having to pass dates like 07/04/09 as 7, 4, 9 without the leading 0 is kind of awkward, for me at least. Minor gripe.

Yeah. I ended using leading 0's in that code all over the place without even thinking about it, since it's so natural to do with dates, but it works fine as long as you don't need 08 or 09. I believe that that's the only place that I've really used numeric literals with a leading 0 though. I don't remember why 08 and 09 aren't legal though, since they clearly aren't octal literals. Oh well, it's a bit annoying, but as you say, it's a minor gripe.

And yay, someone who's actually happy with std.datetime! Actually, several people have been quite happy with it, but with all things, it's the complaints that people generally bother to voice, and as simple and std.datetime is to use, it's a lot to take in. I really need to split it up into separate modules so that the documentation is easier to digest, but I'd like something like DIP 15 or 16 implemented before doing that (which would make it possible to split up std.datetime into a std.datetime package with std.datetime.systime, std.datetime.date, etc. without breaking code, whereas right now, they have to go in a new package). I also need to finish revising the unit tests. So much to do...

Oh well, it works great as it is now, and it's good to hear that my article on std.datetime helped you understand it. Actually, I think that the questions on std.datetime have gone down considerably since I wrote it, so I guess that it's doing its job.

- Jonathan M Davis
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