October 30, 2012
Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8 features have been revealed.

One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are actually compiled to native code as well, before being made available for download.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx

Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler for C# (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the enterprise. :\

--
Paulo
October 31, 2012
On Tuesday, 30 October 2012 at 19:15:59 UTC, Paulo Pinto wrote:
> Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8 features have been revealed.
>
> One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are actually compiled to native code as well, before being made available for download.
>
> http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx
>
> Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler for C# (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the enterprise. :\
>
> --
> Paulo

I don't think they're going to. There are many reasons of keeping assemblies in easy to verify and operate bytecode, and ngen has been here for quite a while without much impact.
October 31, 2012
On Wednesday, 31 October 2012 at 07:19:23 UTC, thedeemon wrote:
> On Tuesday, 30 October 2012 at 19:15:59 UTC, Paulo Pinto wrote:
>> Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8 features have been revealed.
>>
>> One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are actually compiled to native code as well, before being made available for download.
>>
>> http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx
>>
>> Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler for C# (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the enterprise. :\
>>
>> --
>> Paulo
>
> I don't think they're going to. There are many reasons of keeping assemblies in easy to verify and operate bytecode, and ngen has been here for quite a while without much impact.

The problem with ngen is that it has a very basic optimizer, and there are some restrictions to which type of bytecode (no reflection tricks) is ngen-able. Those restrictions are artificial, other C# native code compilers (Mono, Sing#) don't have them.

--
Paulo
October 31, 2012
Le 30/10/2012 20:15, Paulo Pinto a écrit :
> Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8 features have
> been revealed.
>
> One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are actually
> compiled to native code as well, before being made available for download.
>
> http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx
>
>
> Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler for C#
> (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the enterprise. :\
>
> --
> Paulo

This compiler in the cloud things seems really scary. All my apps will not work anymore if microsoft decide so ?
November 01, 2012
On Wednesday, 31 October 2012 at 23:20:15 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
> Le 30/10/2012 20:15, Paulo Pinto a écrit :
>> Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8 features have
>> been revealed.
>>
>> One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are actually
>> compiled to native code as well, before being made available for download.
>>
>> http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx
>>
>>
>> Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler for C#
>> (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the enterprise. :\
>>
>> --
>> Paulo
>
> This compiler in the cloud things seems really scary. All my apps will not work anymore if microsoft decide so ?

I really dislike this cloud trend. It seems that everyone wants to sell me software as a service somehow.

From my lastest projects in the Fortune 500 world, I can tell everyone is jumping with both feets into cloud stuff.

For the lovers of software freedom this is scary. In a world of software as service and patent trolls, having the source code available seems to no longer be enough.

--
Paulo
November 01, 2012
On Thu, 01 Nov 2012 08:43:10 +0100
"Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp@progtools.org> wrote:

> On Wednesday, 31 October 2012 at 23:20:15 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
> > Le 30/10/2012 20:15, Paulo Pinto a écrit :
> >> Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8
> >> features have
> >> been revealed.
> >>
> >> One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are
> >> actually
> >> compiled to native code as well, before being made available
> >> for download.
> >>
> >> http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx
> >>
> >>
> >> Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler
> >> for C#
> >> (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the
> >> enterprise. :\
> >>
> >> --
> >> Paulo
> >
> > This compiler in the cloud things seems really scary. All my apps will not work anymore if microsoft decide so ?
> 
> I really dislike this cloud trend. It seems that everyone wants to sell me software as a service somehow.
> 
>  From my lastest projects in the Fortune 500 world, I can tell
> everyone is jumping with both feets into cloud stuff.
> 
> For the lovers of software freedom this is scary. In a world of software as service and patent trolls, having the source code available seems to no longer be enough.
> 

I feel exactly the same way. (Hell, that's one of the reasons I never
liked web apps.)

A few months ago, I was looking into cross-platform 2D mobile game frameworks and it came down to Corona vs Marmalade. One of the big reasons we went with Marmalade was because Corona was 100% compiled on *their* servers, which lead to various uncomfortable consequences.

I think it's all happening because MBAs are in charge, and the one thing they know and like best is buzzwords. And "cloud" is the biggest buzzword right now.

I really hate the word "cloud" anyway. All it is, is a stupid renaming of the words "Internet", "hosted" and "distributed", and which one it means is usually dependent on context. "Cloud" is my #1 least favorite word right ahead of "tween" (except when used for animation) and using "crazy" as an adverb.

November 01, 2012
On Thu, 1 Nov 2012 18:11:17 -0400
Nick Sabalausky <SeeWebsiteToContactMe@semitwist.com> wrote:

> On Thu, 01 Nov 2012 08:43:10 +0100
> "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp@progtools.org> wrote:
> 
> > On Wednesday, 31 October 2012 at 23:20:15 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
> > > Le 30/10/2012 20:15, Paulo Pinto a écrit :
> > >> Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8
> > >> features have
> > >> been revealed.
> > >>
> > >> One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are
> > >> actually
> > >> compiled to native code as well, before being made available
> > >> for download.
> > >>
> > >> http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler
> > >> for C#
> > >> (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the
> > >> enterprise. :\
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >> Paulo
> > >
> > > This compiler in the cloud things seems really scary. All my apps will not work anymore if microsoft decide so ?
> > 
> > I really dislike this cloud trend. It seems that everyone wants to sell me software as a service somehow.
> > 
> >  From my lastest projects in the Fortune 500 world, I can tell
> > everyone is jumping with both feets into cloud stuff.
> > 
> > For the lovers of software freedom this is scary. In a world of software as service and patent trolls, having the source code available seems to no longer be enough.
> > 
> 
> I feel exactly the same way. (Hell, that's one of the reasons I never
> liked web apps.)
> 
> A few months ago, I was looking into cross-platform 2D mobile game frameworks and it came down to Corona vs Marmalade. One of the big reasons we went with Marmalade was because Corona was 100% compiled on *their* servers, which lead to various uncomfortable consequences.
> 
> I think it's all happening because MBAs are in charge, and the one thing they know and like best is buzzwords. And "cloud" is the biggest buzzword right now.
> 
> I really hate the word "cloud" anyway. All it is, is a stupid renaming of the words "Internet", "hosted" and "distributed", and which one it means is usually dependent on context. "Cloud" is my #1 least favorite word right ahead of "tween" (except when used for animation) and using "crazy" as an adverb.
> 

Speaking of all this:
http://dilbert.com/2012-10-21/

That summarizes it perfectly.

November 03, 2012
On Thursday, 1 November 2012 at 22:15:49 UTC, Nick Sabalausky wrote:
> On Thu, 1 Nov 2012 18:11:17 -0400
> Nick Sabalausky <SeeWebsiteToContactMe@semitwist.com> wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 01 Nov 2012 08:43:10 +0100
>> "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp@progtools.org> wrote:
>> 
>> > On Wednesday, 31 October 2012 at 23:20:15 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
>> > > Le 30/10/2012 20:15, Paulo Pinto a écrit :
>> > >> Now Build 2012 is happening and the new Windows Phone 8 features have
>> > >> been revealed.
>> > >>
>> > >> One of the most interesting is that .NET applications are actually
>> > >> compiled to native code as well, before being made available for download.
>> > >>
>> > >> http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2012/10/30/announcing-the-release-of-the-net-framework-for-windows-phone-8.aspx
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >> Assuming Microsoft eventually releases a native code compiler for C#
>> > >> (better than NGEN), this will make D use harder in the enterprise. :\
>> > >>
>> > >> --
>> > >> Paulo
>> > >
>> > > This compiler in the cloud things seems really scary. All my apps will not work anymore if microsoft decide so ?
>> > 
>> > I really dislike this cloud trend. It seems that everyone wants to sell me software as a service somehow.
>> > 
>> >  From my lastest projects in the Fortune 500 world, I can tell everyone is jumping with both feets into cloud stuff.
>> > 
>> > For the lovers of software freedom this is scary. In a world of software as service and patent trolls, having the source code available seems to no longer be enough.
>> > 
>> 
>> I feel exactly the same way. (Hell, that's one of the reasons I never
>> liked web apps.)
>> 
>> A few months ago, I was looking into cross-platform 2D mobile game
>> frameworks and it came down to Corona vs Marmalade. One of the big
>> reasons we went with Marmalade was because Corona was 100% compiled on
>> *their* servers, which lead to various uncomfortable consequences.
>> 
>> I think it's all happening because MBAs are in charge, and the one
>> thing they know and like best is buzzwords. And "cloud" is the
>> biggest buzzword right now.
>> 
>> I really hate the word "cloud" anyway. All it is, is a stupid renaming
>> of the words "Internet", "hosted" and "distributed", and which one it
>> means is usually dependent on context. "Cloud" is my #1 least favorite
>> word right ahead of "tween" (except when used for animation) and using
>> "crazy" as an adverb.
>> 
>
> Speaking of all this:
> http://dilbert.com/2012-10-21/
>
> That summarizes it perfectly.

Great! :)

November 03, 2012
On Thu, Nov 01, 2012 at 06:11:17PM -0400, Nick Sabalausky wrote:
> On Thu, 01 Nov 2012 08:43:10 +0100
> "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp@progtools.org> wrote:
> 
> > On Wednesday, 31 October 2012 at 23:20:15 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
[...]
> > > This compiler in the cloud things seems really scary. All my apps will not work anymore if microsoft decide so ?
> > 
> > I really dislike this cloud trend. It seems that everyone wants to sell me software as a service somehow.
> > 
> >  From my lastest projects in the Fortune 500 world, I can tell
> > everyone is jumping with both feets into cloud stuff.
> > 
> > For the lovers of software freedom this is scary. In a world of software as service and patent trolls, having the source code available seems to no longer be enough.
[...]

Exactly, so what if you have the full source code if you have no control over the server and no control over your data?


> I feel exactly the same way. (Hell, that's one of the reasons I never
> liked web apps.)
[...]
> I think it's all happening because MBAs are in charge, and the one thing they know and like best is buzzwords. And "cloud" is the biggest buzzword right now.

Yeah no kidding, talk about castles in the air. :-P


> I really hate the word "cloud" anyway. All it is, is a stupid renaming of the words "Internet", "hosted" and "distributed", and which one it means is usually dependent on context. "Cloud" is my #1 least favorite word right ahead of "tween" (except when used for animation) and using "crazy" as an adverb.

It's another one of those overhyped bandwagons of questionable lasting value, that people are jumping on left right and center just because it's a buzzword. Nevermind the privacy issues, scalability issues, software freedom issues, etc..


T

-- 
The most powerful one-line C program: #include "/dev/tty" -- IOCCC
November 04, 2012
On 11/3/2012 8:54 AM, H. S. Teoh wrote:
> It's another one of those overhyped bandwagons of questionable lasting
> value, that people are jumping on left right and center just because
> it's a buzzword.

I'm so glad I never hear "Web 2.0" anymore.
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