Thread overview
static if and early exit from function doesn't seem to work?
Dec 31
aliak
Dec 31
Colin
Jan 01
aliak
December 31
Alo! I'm making a recursive concat function that is similar to chain. The following code works:

import std.range: isInputRange;

auto concat(R, V...)(R range, V values) if (isInputRange!R) {
    import std.range: chain, ElementType;
    static if (V.length) {
        static if (isInputRange!(V[0])) {
            return range.chain(values[0]).concat(values[1..$]);
        } else static if (is(V[0] == ElementType!R)) {
            return range.chain([values[0]]).concat(values[1..$]);
        } // add an else assert here.
    } else {
        return range;
    }
}

But the following does not:

auto concat(R, V...)(R range, V values) if (isInputRange!R) {
    import std.range: chain, ElementType;
    static if (!V.length) {
        return range;
    }
    static if (isInputRange!(V[0])) {
        return range.chain(values[0]).concat(values[1..$]);
    }
    static if (is(V[0] == ElementType!R)) {
        return range.chain([values[0]]).concat(values[1..$]);
    }
}

You get a:

Error: tuple index 0 exceeds 0
Error: template instance range.concat.concat!(Result) error instantiating

So it seems it tries to compile the statements below the check on V.length even though it's guaranteed to be true and there's a return statement inside the if.

Is it a current limitation of static if? or a bug? or is something like this just not possible because of something I'm not seeing?

Cheers

December 31
On Sunday, 31 December 2017 at 13:32:03 UTC, aliak wrote:
> Alo! I'm making a recursive concat function that is similar to chain. The following code works:
>
> [...]

I suspect it's because you've no 'else static if'.
December 31
On Sunday, 31 December 2017 at 13:32:03 UTC, aliak wrote:
> So it seems it tries to compile the statements below the check on V.length even though it's guaranteed to be true and there's a return statement inside the if.

Yeah, static if includes or excludes code independently at compile time.

So what you wrote there would be like, assuming the first to static ifs pass:

auto concat(R, V...)(R range, V values) if (isInputRange!R) {
    import std.range: chain, ElementType;
        return range;
        return range.chain(values[0]).concat(values[1..$]);
}


The code is still there, even if it isn't reached due to an early return, and thus still must compile.


Using else static if means it won't be generated.
January 01
On Sunday, 31 December 2017 at 13:47:32 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe wrote:
> On Sunday, 31 December 2017 at 13:32:03 UTC, aliak wrote:
>> So it seems it tries to compile the statements below the check on V.length even though it's guaranteed to be true and there's a return statement inside the if.
>
> Yeah, static if includes or excludes code independently at compile time.
>
> So what you wrote there would be like, assuming the first to static ifs pass:
>
> auto concat(R, V...)(R range, V values) if (isInputRange!R) {
>     import std.range: chain, ElementType;
>         return range;
>         return range.chain(values[0]).concat(values[1..$]);
> }
>
>
> The code is still there, even if it isn't reached due to an early return, and thus still must compile.
>
> Using else static if means it won't be generated.

Ah ok, thanks! So it is intended behavior. I wonder if treating a return like a static else would be a good idea though. I at least can't see how it would break anything at this time.