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July 28
While the Orgs using D page is very nice ... I hoping to hear more personal stories ...

So

How do you use D?
In work, (key projects or smaller side projects)
in your side project, (github, links please)
just to learn something new? (I would easily argue that learning D will make you a better C++ programmer, maybe not the most efficient way, but I a sure it i very effective)

Did you introduce D to your work place? How? What challenges did you face?

What is you D setup at work, which compiler, which IDE?

And any other fun facts you may want to share :)
July 28
On Friday, 28 July 2017 at 14:58:01 UTC, Ali wrote:
> While the Orgs using D page is very nice ... I hoping to hear more personal stories ...
>
> So
>
> How do you use D?

Privately whenever I need a program for something and D is the right tool for the job.

> in your side project, (github, links please)

Most of my stuff is in a private gitlab instance, but there's tunneled [1], which is essentially a tool for Linux to route an arbitrary application's IPv4 traffic through an OpenVPN tunnel without interfering with the rest of the system's network traffic (i.e. other applications continue as is) using control groups.

> just to learn something new? (I would easily argue that learning D will make you a better C++ programmer, maybe not the most efficient way, but I a sure it i very effective)

I originally started using D1 to learn something new (way back when), but I (on and off) stuck with it till today because it's still the least horrible option out there (that I know of) with the properties I need (designed for native programming, easy C interop, high productivity, maintainability, few UB / wtf moments).

> What is you D setup at work, which compiler, which IDE?

For single file things neovim+dutyl, for projects Sublime Text 3 + custom plugin [2].
No IDEs for me.

> And any other fun facts you may want to share :)

There's a (harmless) memory leak in druntime I want gone [3].

[1] https://github.com/Calrama/tunneled
[2] https://github.com/Calrama/sublide
[3] https://github.com/dlang/druntime/pull/1857
July 28
Ali wrote:

> So
>
> How do you use D?

mostly by invoking dmd or rdmd.
July 28
On Friday, 28 July 2017 at 14:58:01 UTC, Ali wrote:
> How do you use D?

For personal projects, from low-level system hacking (like implementing own reference counted struct) to high-level web apps.

> just to learn something new? (I would easily argue that learning D will make you a better C++ programmer, maybe not the most efficient way, but I a sure it i very effective)

Yup, with D I learned a lot of new programming techniques, like meta-programming, CTFE, Range-based algorithms etc. I really enjoy how quickly I can switch between low- and high-level code without changing the language.
I think this is the main reason why I stayed with D, not with Go/Rust. They're good programming languages, but they force you to code in the way they call "idiomatic", not in the way you want to.
D is a great language, because with all flexibility it has, D community haven't been splitted like in C++.

> What is you D setup at work, which compiler, which IDE?

Latest DMD, Emacs and DUB. I also have LDC and GDC installed for testing. DMD compiles stuff faster than other compilers and has all latest things I need.

> And any other fun facts you may want to share :)

It's a feature (c) Walter Bright, everytime somebody asks about bugs in D
July 28
On 07/28/2017 11:02 AM, Anton Fediushin wrote:

> not with Go/Rust.  They're good programming languages

I really don't want to be in a position to diss other languages but with some experience, I can tell you that I agree with blog posts about Go being a disservice to programmers.[1] It is a good language in the sense that you have to dial your intellectual self down, accept limitations, and be deaf to limitations sold as merits. I can understand "Go is limited because it lacks this and that" but I can't agree with "Go is great because it lacks this and that." Maybe with a little more time I will forget powerful features of other languages and be a content Go programmer. :)

A friend of mine who had left Weka a few months ago has joined a startup in the microservices domain. The company uses Go (and some Python). My friend looked at Go and then spent some time to learn Rust and decided to push D instead for "competitive edge." (Not my words! :) ) His argument was, why should we be wasting time with other languages. So he is using D to write the most critical piece of the product.

> splitted like in C++.

I must have missed that one. Please tell me more about it or give some links to read about it. All I know is there is always disagreement on how some new C++ features should be designed.

Ali

[1] http://nomad.so/2015/03/why-gos-design-is-a-disservice-to-intelligent-programmers/

July 28
On Friday, 28 July 2017 at 14:58:01 UTC, Ali wrote:
> How do you use D?

I use it for everything I can. In the past, I have used it for work as my main job on web apps, though right now my work usage of D is limited to helper apps (it has a legacy ruby on rails codebase I am forced to work with as the main thing).

I still do smaller work and all personal stuff in D to write web apps, little games, data processing, and gui programs.

Most the programs I used day to day are written myself in D like my terminal emulator <https://github.com/adamdruppe/terminal-emulator>, irc program, code searcher, etc.

> Did you introduce D to your work place? How? What challenges did you face?

The old job's main app was a PHP monstrosity that was impossible to maintain so we had to rewrite it... so I rewrote it in D. In about 1/10 the code and dev time, we matched the PHP's basic necessary functionality and were able to go forward with it.

> What is you D setup at work, which compiler, which IDE?

dmd, no ide

> And any other fun facts you may want to share :)

I've been using D for over half my programming years now. Started coding in 1999, started D in 2006... I also actually saw D in 2001 but disregarded it cuz my young self thought it looked like Java and Java sucks. lol
July 28
Ali wrote:

> How do you use D?

ZX Spectrum emulator. Q2-like gfx engine. alot of 2d platformers, based on dynamic AABB trees tech. Secret Project of porting FPC platformer engine to D. highload TCP server. coding *all* my projects exclusively in D for at least 2.5 years now. converted some C coders to D ("look! D is a better C!").
July 28
On Friday, 28 July 2017 at 18:48:25 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:
> On 07/28/2017 11:02 AM, Anton Fediushin wrote:
>
> > not with Go/Rust.  They're good programming languages
>
> I really don't want to be in a position to diss other languages but with some experience, I can tell you that I agree with blog posts about Go being a disservice to programmers.[1] It is a good language in the sense that you have to dial your intellectual self down, accept limitations, and be deaf to limitations sold as merits. I can understand "Go is limited because it lacks this and that" but I can't agree with "Go is great because it lacks this and that." Maybe with a little more time I will forget powerful features of other languages and be a content Go programmer. :)

"Go is great because it lacks things" is true when somebody comes from language, which allows too much (Like JavaScript or PHP).

It is more about marketing. Maybe Go is not a perfect language, maybe not even a good one, but it's sold so good because of a good marketing

So, calling D a "better C++" is a bad advertisement. But if you rename it to '<anything>Script', for example "DatScript" and sell it as "better, statically typed JavaScript dialect which compiles into fast native executables" it will became #1 language on GitHub in no time.

> A friend of mine who had left Weka a few months ago has joined a startup in the microservices domain. The company uses Go (and some Python). My friend looked at Go and then spent some time to learn Rust and decided to push D instead for "competitive edge." (Not my words! :) ) His argument was, why should we be wasting time with other languages. So he is using D to write the most critical piece of the product.

Nice!

> > splitted like in C++.
> I must have missed that one. Please tell me more about it or give some links to read about it. All I know is there is always disagreement on how some new C++ features should be designed.

I am talking about community, not language. C++ community is so huge that they cannot work together on the language, which leads to different compilers supporting different features and different frameworks for same purposes not compatible with each other. So, instead of making something useful, C++ community rewrites same code over and over again in the way they think it should be done.

It happens to new C++ specifications, when some feature got rejected and one compiler implements it, but others doesn't.






July 28
On Friday, 28 July 2017 at 14:58:01 UTC, Ali wrote:

> How do you use D?

I'm an economics professor. A lot of my work requires simulations and other tasks for which a slow language just won't work. I need good integration with C and the ability to call my programs from other languages. D is a perfect fit. I write a lot of functions that coauthors can call from R.

I also use D for a lot of small (few dozen line) scripting tasks, for things like automating distribution of graded assignments to students and that sort of thing.

> in your side project, (github, links please)

I don't program for fun.

> just to learn something new? (I would easily argue that learning D will make you a better C++ programmer, maybe not the most efficient way, but I a sure it i very effective)

I came to D from Lisp and C, so I honestly don't do much I hadn't already been doing, and that's a good thing.

> Did you introduce D to your work place? How? What challenges did you face?

Yes. There are no challenges when you are a researcher because you can do what you want. If I'm working with a grad student, they don't have much choice other than using what I use. Once you convince a researcher to use D, your work is done, because no external approval is needed. I also use some D functions inside R packages for my teaching. The same functionality is available in R, but it is many times slower, and the students will have to use D if they want the speed.

> What is you D setup at work, which compiler, which IDE?

I use Geany, DMD, and LDC.

July 28
> How do you use D?

I use D for building GTK applications, my current project is an open source Linux terminal emulator called Tilix (https://github.com/gnunn1/tilix)

> In work, (key projects or smaller side projects)

Side projects only.

> Did you introduce D to your work place? How? What challenges

No, my day job is all middleware and cloud projects primarily revolving around Java.

> What is you D setup at work, which compiler, which IDE?

Visual Studio Code with the code-d plugin on Linux. I use DMD for development and LDC for releases.


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