July 02, 2012
Because it's apparent to me it's not going to be fixed. Furthermore, what does it gain you over sort(chain(a, b))? This is the first time in the 2 years it's been broken (and apparently Jesse is the only one that knew this! :D) someone has come to IRC with a problem regarding it. From that highly biased sample, I conclude it's not getting used. Anywhere. Or that bug would have more noise (it's the only result for 'completeSort' on bugzilla).

http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=4936

July 02, 2012
This is relatively tongue in cheek of course, but it _has_ been effectively deprecated since 2010. :P
July 02, 2012
On 7/2/12 5:50 AM, Bernard Helyer wrote:
> Because it's apparent to me it's not going to be fixed. Furthermore,
> what does it gain you over sort(chain(a, b))? This is the first time in
> the 2 years it's been broken (and apparently Jesse is the only one that
> knew this! :D) someone has come to IRC with a problem regarding it. From
> that highly biased sample, I conclude it's not getting used. Anywhere.
> Or that bug would have more noise (it's the only result for
> 'completeSort' on bugzilla).
>
> http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=4936

It's a fairly specialized function, but we shouldn't draw conclusions about usefulness of library functions from current use alone.

Andrei

July 02, 2012
My main point is that it doesn't work. Even the given example does not work. It should either be fixed or ditched.
July 03, 2012
On Monday, 2 July 2012 at 14:05:31 UTC, Bernard Helyer wrote:
> My main point is that it doesn't work. Even the given example does not work. It should either be fixed or ditched.

It does work, it just requires a sorted range instead of an arbitrary range.

std.range.assumeSorted()
std.algorithm.sort()

take your pick for getting a sorted range.
July 03, 2012
On 7/3/12 10:01 AM, Jesse Phillips wrote:
> On Monday, 2 July 2012 at 14:05:31 UTC, Bernard Helyer wrote:
>> My main point is that it doesn't work. Even the given example does not
>> work. It should either be fixed or ditched.
>
> It does work, it just requires a sorted range instead of an arbitrary
> range.
>
> std.range.assumeSorted()
> std.algorithm.sort()
>
> take your pick for getting a sorted range.

We need to fix the example.

Andrei
July 03, 2012
On Tuesday, 3 July 2012 at 14:30:38 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
> On 7/3/12 10:01 AM, Jesse Phillips wrote:
>> On Monday, 2 July 2012 at 14:05:31 UTC, Bernard Helyer wrote:
>>> My main point is that it doesn't work. Even the given example does not
>>> work. It should either be fixed or ditched.
>>
>> It does work, it just requires a sorted range instead of an arbitrary
>> range.
>>
>> std.range.assumeSorted()
>> std.algorithm.sort()
>>
>> take your pick for getting a sorted range.
>
> We need to fix the example.
>
> Andrei

The example uses assumeSorted, so if you could let the rest
of the world know how to use it, that'd be great. ;P
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