August 23
On Saturday, 22 August 2020 at 07:04:19 UTC, Petar Kirov [ZombineDev] wrote:
>
> I feel like limiting CTFE just gives a false sense of security and destroys many interesting use cases. If a part of my build system will do directory traversal to build the list of files to import, what difference would it make to not have this as a single build step. The argument that somehow
>
>     dmd -run gen_code.d | dmd -
>
> Is more secure than just:
>
>     dmd file.d # file.d is allowed to access the FS at CT
>
> makes no sense to me.
>
> See Jai for example. You can run absolutely *any* code at compile time. 5 years ago Jai's creator made a demo of running an OpenGL game at CT [1]. In the same demo he also used CTFE to validate calls to printf. He made the case that while many compilers go the route of hard-coding checks for printf style functions in the compiler, he thinks that users should be able to implement arbitrary checks in their code. And 5 years later, instead of D expanding the frontiers of what's possible via CTFE, printf checking was hard coded in the compiler [2].
>
> [1]: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTqZNujQOlA
> [2]: https://github.com/dlang/dmd/pull/10812/files
>
> I don't need say that unlimited CTFE has been a huge success for Jai. What I wish is that we can learn from this stop bringing arguments that C people would bring for D's CTFE ("My Makefile calls a Python script to generate C code and it's doing just fine, so I don't think one should be allowed to run code at compile time, as it will make the code just harder to follow").
>
> As another example, types in Zig are first class citizens [3] and can be manipulated with CTFE just like any other value. "Type functions" in D should just be regular D functions taking types as parameters and returning types.
>
> [3]: https://ziglang.org/documentation/master/#Introducing-the-Compile-Time-Concept

Strongly Agreed!

Next ›   Last »
1 2