November 05, 2012
On Monday, November 05, 2012 11:00:27 jdrewsen wrote:
> It seems like the C++ committee is speeding up development adding lots of the goodies from D like Ranges, static if, template contraints etc.
> 
> Will D still have a case when C++ gets this done?
> 
> I wonder if Andrei is part of the C++ Ranges Study Group?
> 
> The Future of C++: http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005

The closer that C++ gets to D, the less interested that many people will be in adopting it, particularly because of the large user base and the large amount of code out there that already uses C++. Programmers have to be convinced to move to D, and for many C++ programmers, the improvements to C++11 are enough to make a move to D not worth it, even if D is a better language.

But C++ will never have all that D does. There are too many things that it would have to fundamentally change (e.g. how arrays work) which it can't change, because it would break backwards compatibility. Many of C++'s flaws stem from retaining backwards compatibility with C, and they're not going to break that now either. So, while they can do a lot to improve C++, there's a definite limit to it. D will ultimately have similar problems, since we'll have to maintain backwards compatibility for the same reasons that every other mainstream language does, but it's definitely ahead of C++ in that regard, because it was able to learn from C++'s mistakes. And if we ever create a D3, and we're willing to actually break compatibility with that version change (which C++ will never do in any real way with any version change), then we can avoid C++'s fate in that regard to at least some extent, but then you get into a situation like python 2 and python 3 or perl 5 and perl 6.

In any case, it's pretty much a given that improving C++ will mean that fewer people will move away from it to other languages, but it's also a given that there are fundamental problems with C++ that can't be fixed, and in that regard, D will always come out ahead of it.

- Jonathan M Davis
November 06, 2012
Am Mon, 05 Nov 2012 13:10:35 +0100
schrieb "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp@progtools.org>:

> On Monday, 5 November 2012 at 11:06:39 UTC, monarch_dodra wrote:
> > On Monday, 5 November 2012 at 10:22:02 UTC, Nick Sabalausky wrote:
> >> On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 11:00:27 +0100
> >> "jdrewsen" <nospam4321@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>> It seems like the C++ committee is speeding up development adding lots of the goodies from D like Ranges, static if, template contraints etc.
> >>> 
> >>> Will D still have a case when C++ gets this done?
> >>> 
> >>
> >>
> >> Yes, even if they go and add all of D's features, D will still
> >> be much
> >> cleaner. (IMO)
> >
> > C++'s "range" is actually a wrapper over an iterator "first-last" pair. While it does bring the convenience of D's ranges to C++, it remains hobbled in terms of efficiency and implementation. C++'s paradigm is pointers and iterators. At best, you can sparkle some ranges over it, but you'll never shift the paradigm.
> >
> > --------
> > The thing with C++'s new feature is that it requires developers to be on the bleeding edge of C++ knowledge. It's fine for the enthusiasts that read programming journals on their week-ends (like you and I), but not for the standard developer. Not to mention, even then, the syntax is hard as hell: lambdas in for loops? I have to look up the syntax every time. automatic type inference of the return value of a function? "auto foo() -> declype(...)", what...?
> >
> > All these functionalities are great, but also out of reach. Most of my colleagues still struggle with "simple" design patters such as strategies, or just plain algorithms with functors. Everytime I say something like "awesome, C++ will allow type inference" or "yay, RValue references!" they look at me like I'm some kind of weird space alien...
> >
> > --------
> > D packages the whole thing in an easy to use but complete package. C++ just stacks complicated stuff on top of a hard to use core.
> 
> I have the same feeling with some of our developers.
> 
> Simpler languages tend to be manager friendly. It is always easier to find cheap resources.
> 
> In my currently employer I have only done Java and C# projects so far, and I still fear the day I might do a C or C++ project, given the type of knowledge shown by some of our coworkers.
> 
> 
> --
> Paulo

Are you talking bad about your colleagues behind their backs ? Hey, if I was to write a project in Haskell I'd be the idiot, too.

-- 
Marco

November 06, 2012
On 11/05/2012 04:54 PM, deadalnix wrote:
> Le 05/11/2012 11:22, Nick Sabalausky a écrit :
>> On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 11:00:27 +0100
>> "jdrewsen"<nospam4321@hotmail.com>  wrote:
>>
>>> It seems like the C++ committee is speeding up development adding
>>> lots of the goodies from D like Ranges, static if, template
>>> contraints etc.
>>>
>>> Will D still have a case when C++ gets this done?
>>>
>>
>>
>> Yes, even if they go and add all of D's features, D will still be much
>> cleaner. (IMO)
>>
>
> You never heard about @property ?

The enhanced C++ as specified by Nick will have it as well, so it is not too relevant here whether you consider it clean or not. :)
February 01
On Monday, 5 November 2012 at 18:20:23 UTC, Jonathan M Davis wrote:

> The closer that C++ gets to D, the less interested that many people will be in adopting it, particularly because of the large user base and the large amount of code out there that already uses C++. Programmers have to be convinced to  move to D, and for many C++ programmers, the improvements to C++11 are enough  to make a move to D not worth it, even if D is a better language.

(He goes on to point out that nonetheless D will always have the edge because legacy and installed base).

One should be careful about superficial translation of instances from the purely commercial world to the world of languages, but it strikes me that Clayton Christensen's Innovator's Dilemma does apply somewhat to the case of D vs its peer languages.  His central point is that in the beginning disruptive innovation very often tends to commence as a niche thing that may well be globally inferior - he uses the example of Honda motorbikes that allowed them to gain a foothold, and that once they dominated this niche and gained succour from it were able to use to expand their footprint to the extent that they posed a serious threat to the established dominant players.  But for many years, these (and later the cars) were seen as products of clearly inferior quality that had the advantage of being cheap.

The interesting thing is the emotional aspect of perception - nobody would have taken you seriously had you predicted in the early stages that Japanese auto makers would become what they subsequently became.  And one could have pointed out some decades after the war ended that they had been in the business for years, and why should anything change.  This is exactly what people say about D - it's been around forever and hasn't taken off, so why bother.  (see recent Slashdot thread for an example of this).

It is a basic insight of gestalt psychology that perception is shaped by emotion (really it's affect, which goes much deeper - emotion is the tip of the affect iceberg), and one way to know when this is occurring (my background is as an investor and speculator, so I have devoted a couple of decades to applying this in a practical way) is that on the one hand you have an emotional intensity out of proportion to the importance of the topic, and on the other the reasons people put forward to justify how they feel are observably not in accordance with the facts.  See the Slashdot thread...

So in any case, D is not competing on price, but has other strengths that are of very high appeal to a certain group (if you want to write native code in a productive way) even though one must honestly acknowledge its imperfections in a global sense - reading back through the forums a dozen years, this seems to occur quite regularly in waves.  "When is D going to be finished?" even a decade back.  To be upset by the imperfections is missing the point, because languages - even programming languages - have a certain innate pattern of development (that resembles Goethe's observations about the metamorphosis of plants) that can't be forced, no matter how much one grumbles or stamps one's feet.

Furthermore, people tend to extrapolate superficial trends even though history tells us this is a poor guide to the future.  Japanese cars really took off once crude exploded in the early 70s (and again towards the end), and auto-makers were slow to respond.  Perhaps they did not organize their business on the basis of a prediction abuot energy prices, but the point is they were ready to take advantage of this shift when it occurred.

I do not want to attempt to be a pundit, but it is interesting that the notable use cases of D - at Sociomantic, Adroll, and Facebook are all aligned with certain salient and very powerful underlying technological drivers and trends.  It's no longer true in many applications that programmer time is expensive compared to machine time, and large data sets encountering the challenges of memory vs CPU trajectories create new challenges and require new approaches.  And it is a positive for D that some of its competition does not take D seriously at this stage - one thinks for example of Guido and his insistence that execution speed ought not to be a factor given work is I/O + network bound, even though this is less true for numerical computing and some kinds of data crunching.  (Not that D is mature here, but there is much that can be done within the existing framework).

In any case, dissatisfaction channeled in a constructive direction is a positive thing, because it is the opposite of complacency and is the edge of the challenger.  The point isn't how people feel, but how they respond to the challenges in front of them.

As a newcomer, it is very satisfying to see the progress made on documentation, ecosystem, and C++ integration and I have quite some respect for the difficulty of the roles of Walter and Andrei.  One is so short of time and attention, and no matter how hard one works and, whatever decisions one makes, it is impossible to keep everyone happy.  If one isn't being criticized, one isn't doing it right.  (Which is not to say that some of the criticisms will not have merit).

Here is a table from an article exploring Christensen's ideas.  There are some resonances with past and current questions in the development of D, although as I said one can't map things perfectly because it's a different situation.  And the original book is better than what has been written based upon it.

[Table doesn't format well, but you can see it here.  The surrounding text is less relevant].
http://recode.net/2014/01/06/the-four-stages-of-disruption-2/



Laeeth.
February 02
On Monday, 5 November 2012 at 10:00:29 UTC, jdrewsen wrote:
> It seems like the C++ committee is speeding up development adding lots of the goodies from D like Ranges, static if, template contraints etc.
>
> Will D still have a case when C++ gets this done?
>
> I wonder if Andrei is part of the C++ Ranges Study Group?
>
> The Future of C++:
> http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005
>
> /Jonas

Fast compile time, bearable syntax, thread safety arc so on...

C++ is building on faulty foundation. I see them talking example from us as a good news.
February 02
Thanks for the good read!

BTW, one effect D has had is that other languages are adopting D's features, though few will admit it.
February 02
On 2/1/15 4:35 PM, deadalnix wrote:
> On Monday, 5 November 2012 at 10:00:29 UTC, jdrewsen wrote:
>> It seems like the C++ committee is speeding up development adding lots
>> of the goodies from D like Ranges, static if, template contraints etc.
>>
>> Will D still have a case when C++ gets this done?
>>
>> I wonder if Andrei is part of the C++ Ranges Study Group?
>>
>> The Future of C++:
>> http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005
>>
>> /Jonas
>
> Fast compile time, bearable syntax, thread safety arc so on...
>
> C++ is building on faulty foundation. I see them talking example from us
> as a good news.

Wait, is this a reply today to a post made in November 2012? -- Andrei

February 02
On Sunday, 1 February 2015 at 23:20:15 UTC, Laeeth Isharc wrote:
> [Table doesn't format well, but you can see it here.  The surrounding text is less relevant].
> http://recode.net/2014/01/06/the-four-stages-of-disruption-2/

Heh, funny that that article was written by Sinofsky, who manifestly failed with his re-imagining of Windows with Win8, which is why he was soon given the boot.  Although, Win7 shipped under his watch and it's the first Windows that I could bear to use, actually a decent OS.
February 02
On 2/1/15 7:51 PM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
> On 2/1/15 4:35 PM, deadalnix wrote:
>> On Monday, 5 November 2012 at 10:00:29 UTC, jdrewsen wrote:
>>> It seems like the C++ committee is speeding up development adding lots
>>> of the goodies from D like Ranges, static if, template contraints etc.
>>>
>>> Will D still have a case when C++ gets this done?
>>>
>>> I wonder if Andrei is part of the C++ Ranges Study Group?
>>>
>>> The Future of C++:
>>> http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005
>>>
>>> /Jonas
>>
>> Fast compile time, bearable syntax, thread safety arc so on...
>>
>> C++ is building on faulty foundation. I see them talking example from us
>> as a good news.
>
> Wait, is this a reply today to a post made in November 2012? -- Andrei
>

Yes, here is what happens:

1. person does a search, finds 2+ year old thread that he likes to respond to.
2. Entire thread gets pushed to the "most recent" posts on forum/newsgroup
3. Others now see the thread (possibly for the second time), and don't realize it's old, and read it thinking it's about today.

A nice thing might be to make color of posts on forum.dlang.org based on recentness, 2+ month old be one color, 1+ year be another.

This wouldn't help with newsgroup users, but it probably would help with forum users.

-Steve
February 02
On Monday, 2 February 2015 at 00:49:14 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:
> Thanks for the good read!
>
> BTW, one effect D has had is that other languages are adopting D's features, though few will admit it.

But those who know are very grateful to D for that.

OTOH, it would be a pity if D remains just a good proof of concept...
1 2 3 4
Top | Discussion index | About this forum | D home