July 09, 2012
When I try to compile the code below I get this error:
 prova00.obj(prova00)
 Error 42: Symbol Undefined _D6prova013implementThisFZi
 --errorlevel 1

This is my code:

File prova0.d:
import std.stdio;
int implementThis();
void callThis()
{
	writefln("%d",implementThis());
}

File prova00.d:
import prova0;
int implementThis()
{
	return 42;
}
void main()
{
	callThis();
}

Can someone help me, please?
July 09, 2012
On Monday, 9 July 2012 at 08:45:25 UTC, lodo wrote:
> When I try to compile the code below I get this error:
>  prova00.obj(prova00)
>  Error 42: Symbol Undefined _D6prova013implementThisFZi
>  --errorlevel 1
>
> This is my code:
>
> File prova0.d:
> import std.stdio;
> int implementThis();
> void callThis()
> {
> 	writefln("%d",implementThis());
> }
>
> File prova00.d:
> import prova0;
> int implementThis()
> {
> 	return 42;
> }
> void main()
> {
> 	callThis();
> }
>
> Can someone help me, please?

The module gets mangled into the function name. So the implementThis that you declare in prova0.d is different from the one you implement in prova00.d.

You could use externC to prevent the mangling.

July 09, 2012
On Monday, 9 July 2012 at 09:15:52 UTC, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
> On Monday, 9 July 2012 at 08:45:25 UTC, lodo wrote:
>> When I try to compile the code below I get this error:
>> prova00.obj(prova00)
>> Error 42: Symbol Undefined _D6prova013implementThisFZi
>> --errorlevel 1
>>
>> This is my code:
>>
>> File prova0.d:
>> import std.stdio;
>> int implementThis();
>> void callThis()
>> {
>> 	writefln("%d",implementThis());
>> }
>>
>> File prova00.d:
>> import prova0;
>> int implementThis()
>> {
>> 	return 42;
>> }
>> void main()
>> {
>> 	callThis();
>> }
>>
>> Can someone help me, please?
>
> The module gets mangled into the function name. So the implementThis that you declare in prova0.d is different from the one you implement in prova00.d.
>
> You could use externC to prevent the mangling.

Now it works! I added "extern(C)" to both declaration and implementation of "implementThis". Thank you, Tobias.


July 09, 2012
> Now it works! I added "extern(C)" to both declaration and implementation of "implementThis". Thank you, Tobias.

No problem. What are you planning to do anyway? It seems that you want to have loose coupling between the modules since you don't just import the prove00.d.

Using the linker for this seems rather fragile and I don't think this approach will scale with multiple implementations. Using D you could consider doing something along these lines:

A.d:
void callThis(alias callee, Args ...) { callee(Args); }

B.d:
void implThis(string foo) { writeln(foo); }

callThis!(implThis)("bar");

Not tested.
July 10, 2012
Let suppose I'm writing a library for Win32 applications, called "mylibrary".
A program, called "UserProgram", that uses this library would be like this:

UserProgram.d:
import mylibrary;
import std.c.windows.windows;
int WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst,HINSTANCE hPrevInst,LPSTR cmdLine,int cmdShow)
{
    //initialization of mylibrary
    //usercode
    //de-initialization of mylibrary
}

What I was trying to do with prova0 and prova00 was something like this:

mylibrary.d:
public import std.c.windows.windows;
extern(C) void UserMain();
int WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst,HINSTANCE hPrevInst,LPSTR cmdLine,int cmdShow)
{
    //initialization of mylibrary
    UserMain();
    //de-initialization of mylibrary
}
UserProgram.d:
import mylibrary;
extern(C) void UserMain()
{
    //usercode
}

This second way would be much cleaner for the user of the library.
P.S.: Sorry for my english: I know I'm not very good in it.
July 10, 2012
Let suppose I'm writing a library for Win32 applications called "mylibrary".
The code of a program, called "UserProgram", that uses this library would be like this:

UserProgram.d:
import mylibrary;
import std.c.windows.windows;
int WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst,HINSTANCE hPrevInst,LPSTR cmdLine,int cmdShow)
{
    //initialization of mylibrary
    //user code
    //de-initialization of mylibrary
}

What i was trying to do with prova0 and prova00 was calling WinMain inside mylibrary, doing initialization and then call a user-defined procedure with only the user-code. Then, doing de-initialization and returning from WinMain inside the libary. In this way, the user have to define only his code. Something like this:

mylibrary.d:
public import std.c.windows.windows;
extern(C) UserMain();
int WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst,HINSTANCE hPrevInst,LPSTR cmdLine,int cmdShow)
{
    //initialization of mylibrary
    UserMain();
    //de-initialization of mylibrary
}
UserProgram.d:
import mylibrary;
extern(C) void UserMain()
{
    //user code
}

I think this second way is much cleaner for the user and prevent him from using mylibrary without correct initialization and de-initialization.
I can't use static module initializers for this task because i need the parameters of WinMain for the initialization.
P.S.: Sorry for my english, I know I'm not very good in it.
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