December 03, 2012
How is a playing card's rank represented most elegantly in code?

* Should be a customized uint/an own type representing uints in the range of 2 through 14.
* void foo(Rank rank) {  } // Accepts only the valid range
  foo(0);  // Error
  foo(2);  // Ok
  foo(10); // Ok

  alias J 11;
  alias Q 12;
  etc.,

  foo(J);  // Ok
  foo(Q);  // Ok
  foo(B);  // Error


December 03, 2012
deed:

> How is a playing card's rank represented most elegantly in code?

Maybe with an enum?

enum Card { J, Q, ...}

If you have to store many of them then maybe giving them a size of one byte is better:

enum Card : ubyte { Ace, Two, ..., Q, ...}


Bye,
bearophile
December 03, 2012
On Monday, 3 December 2012 at 23:42:38 UTC, bearophile wrote:
> deed:
>
>> How is a playing card's rank represented most elegantly in code?
>
> Maybe with an enum?
>
> enum Card { J, Q, ...}
>
> If you have to store many of them then maybe giving them a size of one byte is better:
>
> enum Card : ubyte { Ace, Two, ..., Q, ...}
>
>
> Bye,
> bearophile


Using enum Rank { J=11, Q, K, A } doesn't enable the function signature to be foo(Rank rank) when calling with 2, 3, .. 10, right?

And using enum Rank { two, three, four, ... , K, A } is not elegant.

I'd like to be able to call foo(Rank rank) with foo(3) and foo(Q).

December 04, 2012
deed:

> And using enum Rank { two, three, four, ... , K, A } is not elegant.

But it's strongly typed, so it's safere. It's my preferred solution for a problem like this.


> I'd like to be able to call foo(Rank rank) with foo(3) and foo(Q).

Then use module level compile-time constant...

Bye,
bearophile
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