April 22, 2012
https://github.com/bhelyer/DDCPU-16

DDCPU-16 is a D implementation of Notch's (of Minecraft fame)
DCPU-16, a fictional 16 bit CPU for his upcoming game, 0x10c.
More info at http://0x10c.com, including specs.

You'll see a grand total of two source files, and one is only
really there for my testing. The only interesting module is
dcpu16.cpu, which contains a class CPU with two public methods of
note: load(ushort[]) to load code and run(int) to run it for a
minimum number of cycles.

The CPU code is completely freestanding, with no dependencies
(even on Phobos) and is @safe ready, and pure where possible.

Manu is planning on hooking up some virtual hardware to it (which
is described in basic form elsewhere). No real reason for this,
just needed something to fill a Sunday.

I've only tested it to the extent that I've stepped through Notch's
example in the spec (the one loaded in main.d) and verified that
works, but I'm sure there'll be more bugs lurking. If you find
the bugs that I'm sure are still lurking, create an issue on GitHub.


-Bernard.
April 22, 2012
Am Sun, 22 Apr 2012 11:55:35 +0200
schrieb "Bernard Helyer" <b.helyer@gmail.com>:

> https://github.com/bhelyer/DDCPU-16
> 
> DDCPU-16 is a D implementation of Notch's (of Minecraft fame) DCPU-16, a fictional 16 bit CPU for his upcoming game, 0x10c. More info at http://0x10c.com, including specs.
> 
> You'll see a grand total of two source files, and one is only really there for my testing. The only interesting module is dcpu16.cpu, which contains a class CPU with two public methods of note: load(ushort[]) to load code and run(int) to run it for a minimum number of cycles.
> 
> The CPU code is completely freestanding, with no dependencies (even on Phobos) and is @safe ready, and pure where possible.
> 
> Manu is planning on hooking up some virtual hardware to it (which is described in basic form elsewhere). No real reason for this, just needed something to fill a Sunday.
> 
> I've only tested it to the extent that I've stepped through
> Notch's
> example in the spec (the one loaded in main.d) and verified that
> works, but I'm sure there'll be more bugs lurking. If you find
> the bugs that I'm sure are still lurking, create an issue on
> GitHub.
> 
> 
> -Bernard.

Haha, just today I watched a video about it and thought "D"CPU .. well if that isn't a call for action ;) Unfortunately Java has a native unsigned 16-bit data type (char). Otherwise Notch would probably have chosen D for writing 0x10^c. ;)
As with Minecraft, I like the vision and technical realisation, but I wouldn't pay for and play them. I'm sure you had fun writing the CPU simulator. We wrote one (as a class project) at a vocational school a while back - in Java. It was for an 8086 and I did the CPU core logic. Most functions could be classified (like logical OR/XOR/..., accesses regs,mem,...) but for the rest I didn't find any pattern and called the corresponding class (translated) "ThenAMiracleHappens", referring to the well known comic: http://blog.wisefaq.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/amoh-small.jpg
It was spiced with a two lines long ternary operator :? expression and no further comments. :D

-- 
Marco

April 22, 2012
On 22-04-2012 20:12, Marco Leise wrote:
> Am Sun, 22 Apr 2012 11:55:35 +0200
> schrieb "Bernard Helyer"<b.helyer@gmail.com>:
>
>> https://github.com/bhelyer/DDCPU-16
>>
>> DDCPU-16 is a D implementation of Notch's (of Minecraft fame)
>> DCPU-16, a fictional 16 bit CPU for his upcoming game, 0x10c.
>> More info at http://0x10c.com, including specs.
>>
>> You'll see a grand total of two source files, and one is only
>> really there for my testing. The only interesting module is
>> dcpu16.cpu, which contains a class CPU with two public methods of
>> note: load(ushort[]) to load code and run(int) to run it for a
>> minimum number of cycles.
>>
>> The CPU code is completely freestanding, with no dependencies
>> (even on Phobos) and is @safe ready, and pure where possible.
>>
>> Manu is planning on hooking up some virtual hardware to it (which
>> is described in basic form elsewhere). No real reason for this,
>> just needed something to fill a Sunday.
>>
>> I've only tested it to the extent that I've stepped through
>> Notch's
>> example in the spec (the one loaded in main.d) and verified that
>> works, but I'm sure there'll be more bugs lurking. If you find
>> the bugs that I'm sure are still lurking, create an issue on
>> GitHub.
>>
>>
>> -Bernard.
>
> Haha, just today I watched a video about it and thought "D"CPU .. well if that isn't a call for action ;) Unfortunately Java has a native unsigned 16-bit data type (char). Otherwise Notch would probably have chosen D for writing 0x10^c. ;)
> As with Minecraft, I like the vision and technical realisation, but I wouldn't pay for and play them. I'm sure you had fun writing the CPU simulator. We wrote one (as a class project) at a vocational school a while back - in Java. It was for an 8086 and I did the CPU core logic. Most functions could be classified (like logical OR/XOR/..., accesses regs,mem,...) but for the rest I didn't find any pattern and called the corresponding class (translated) "ThenAMiracleHappens", referring to the well known comic: http://blog.wisefaq.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/amoh-small.jpg
> It was spiced with a two lines long ternary operator :? expression and no further comments. :D
>

I think the fact that you have to use 'char' as 'ushort' in Java says enough about the language and VM. ;)

/me runs

-- 
- Alex
April 22, 2012
On Sunday, 22 April 2012 at 18:36:06 UTC, Alex Rønne Petersen wrote:
> On 22-04-2012 20:12, Marco Leise wrote:
>> Am Sun, 22 Apr 2012 11:55:35 +0200
>> schrieb "Bernard Helyer"<b.helyer@gmail.com>:
>>
>>> https://github.com/bhelyer/DDCPU-16
>>>
>>> DDCPU-16 is a D implementation of Notch's (of Minecraft fame)
>>> DCPU-16, a fictional 16 bit CPU for his upcoming game, 0x10c.
>>> More info at http://0x10c.com, including specs.
>>>
>>> You'll see a grand total of two source files, and one is only
>>> really there for my testing. The only interesting module is
>>> dcpu16.cpu, which contains a class CPU with two public methods of
>>> note: load(ushort[]) to load code and run(int) to run it for a
>>> minimum number of cycles.
>>>
>>> The CPU code is completely freestanding, with no dependencies
>>> (even on Phobos) and is @safe ready, and pure where possible.
>>>
>>> Manu is planning on hooking up some virtual hardware to it (which
>>> is described in basic form elsewhere). No real reason for this,
>>> just needed something to fill a Sunday.
>>>
>>> I've only tested it to the extent that I've stepped through
>>> Notch's
>>> example in the spec (the one loaded in main.d) and verified that
>>> works, but I'm sure there'll be more bugs lurking. If you find
>>> the bugs that I'm sure are still lurking, create an issue on
>>> GitHub.
>>>
>>>
>>> -Bernard.
>>
>> Haha, just today I watched a video about it and thought "D"CPU .. well if that isn't a call for action ;) Unfortunately Java has a native unsigned 16-bit data type (char). Otherwise Notch would probably have chosen D for writing 0x10^c. ;)
>> As with Minecraft, I like the vision and technical realisation, but I wouldn't pay for and play them. I'm sure you had fun writing the CPU simulator. We wrote one (as a class project) at a vocational school a while back - in Java. It was for an 8086 and I did the CPU core logic. Most functions could be classified (like logical OR/XOR/..., accesses regs,mem,...) but for the rest I didn't find any pattern and called the corresponding class (translated) "ThenAMiracleHappens", referring to the well known comic: http://blog.wisefaq.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/amoh-small.jpg
>> It was spiced with a two lines long ternary operator :? expression and no further comments. :D
>>
>
> I think the fact that you have to use 'char' as 'ushort' in Java says enough about the language and VM. ;)
>
> /me runs

My latest issue with Java is the trend to add annotations instead of keywords, like @Override, or the new type annotations like @NotNull and so on.

Its slowly going to annotation hell.

April 24, 2012
I'm afraid that you not are the first that did a DCPU-16 emulator in D :
https://github.com/Zardoz89/DEDCPU-16
Just now, I can't update because I have now the final examinations. I had
scheduled a comple rewrite to get a better cycle count and timming acurracy
and adding a real I/O support. Plus, Notch just release now, a update specs
(on reddit) that broken anything using the olds specs and add HardWare &
SoftWare Interrupts.

If you have interest of going serius with DCPU-16, we can talk of joining our efforts.

Bernard Helyer wrote:

> https://github.com/bhelyer/DDCPU-16
> 
> DDCPU-16 is a D implementation of Notch's (of Minecraft fame) DCPU-16, a fictional 16 bit CPU for his upcoming game, 0x10c. More info at http://0x10c.com, including specs.
> 
> You'll see a grand total of two source files, and one is only really there for my testing. The only interesting module is dcpu16.cpu, which contains a class CPU with two public methods of note: load(ushort[]) to load code and run(int) to run it for a minimum number of cycles.
> 
> The CPU code is completely freestanding, with no dependencies (even on Phobos) and is @safe ready, and pure where possible.
> 
> Manu is planning on hooking up some virtual hardware to it (which is described in basic form elsewhere). No real reason for this, just needed something to fill a Sunday.
> 
> I've only tested it to the extent that I've stepped through
> Notch's
> example in the spec (the one loaded in main.d) and verified that
> works, but I'm sure there'll be more bugs lurking. If you find
> the bugs that I'm sure are still lurking, create an issue on
> GitHub.
> 
> 
> -Bernard.
-- 
I'm afraid that I have a blog: http://zardoz.es
April 28, 2012
On Sunday, 22 April 2012 at 20:13:01 UTC, Paulo Pinto wrote:
>
> My latest issue with Java is the trend to add annotations instead of keywords, like @Override, or the new type annotations like @NotNull and so on.
>
> Its slowly going to annotation hell.

Yeah, I can see that too.
April 29, 2012
Now with GUI, and the CPU is up to date with the latest spec (1.7
as of writing), and all the standard hardware (and a floppy
device!) implemented. You'll need SIEGE compiled -- if you want
some help there, I can supply those .lib files for windows. Linux
too, but that shouldn't be difficult at all.
May 05, 2012
> My latest issue with Java is the trend to add annotations instead of keywords, like @Override, or the new type annotations like @NotNull and so on.
>
> Its slowly going to annotation hell.

It was never clear for me why use annotations instead of proper keywords.
Yes, annotations are supposed to be a kind of meta-language but, then, why to make those part of a language? If they are intended to be part of the language, they should be proper keywords, no more, no less.
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