November 29, 2017
On Wednesday, 29 November 2017 at 12:05:06 UTC, Ola Fosheim Grostad wrote:
> On Wednesday, 29 November 2017 at 10:47:31 UTC, aberba wrote:
>> to death learning these stuff in lectures. I learnt them beyond the syllables years back on my own at a much quicker pase.
>
> CS isnt about the languages themselves, that is trivial. Basically covered in the first or second semester.
>
>> You become experienced and skilled when you're passionate about it.
>
> Sure, imperative languages are all mostly the same, and easy to learn once you know the basics (C++ being an exception).  Learning frameworks takes time, but there are too many frameworks for anyone to master, and they are quickly outdated.
>
> So the only knowledgebase that isnt getting outdated are the models from CS.

Wirth puts it nicely, it is all about algorithms, data structures and
learning how to apply them to any language.
November 30, 2017
On Wednesday, 29 November 2017 at 10:47:31 UTC, aberba wrote:
> On Thursday, 8 January 2015 at 11:10:09 UTC, Johanna Burgos wrote:
>> Your Mission
>>
>
>> Your Track Record
>>
>> Degree in Computer Science, or closely-related
>>
>
> It baffles me that recruitment still works using this as a requirement. A CS graduate will never know any of these besides basic intro to C, C++, html, css,  databases,  and basic hardware-software theory... without self learning and practice.
>
> I've never sat in a cs class for a second and I will be bored to death learning these stuff in lectures. I learnt them beyond the syllables years back on my own at a much quicker pase.
>
> You become experienced and skilled when you're passionate about it.  Its how I started from being curious about how software is made to a full stack generalist... knowing more stack than the above requirements.
>
> You want skills not pedigree.

Incompetence in hiring and HR is par for the course pretty much everywhere, lots of threads about it on proggit/HN/blogs these days.  Take for example the recent sexual harassment scandals in the US, where HR depts did nothing for decades.  People rightly complain about much smaller stuff than that not getting done well by HR, so of course they don't handle real malfeasance properly.

The biggest joke is that these companies all claim they want the best talent, when they have no idea what the best is in the first place:

https://danluu.com/programmer-moneyball/

It is one of the main reasons for the rise of open source, because you can't stop anyone from contributing or forking, assuming they have the extra time/money to do so.
November 30, 2017
On Wednesday, 29 November 2017 at 15:11:17 UTC, Paulo Pinto wrote:
> Wirth puts it nicely, it is all about algorithms, data structures and
> learning how to apply them to any language.

Yes, they also mention machine learning, which borrows from many fields close to applied mathematics. Linear algebra, statistical signal processing, statistical modelling, etc... I took a course on statistical signal processing this year (using Hayes book + extras) and experience without theoretical training would be inefficient. You have to tailor the algorithms to the characteristics in the signal...


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