November 22
On Friday, 22 November 2019 at 11:05:24 UTC, Antonio Corbi wrote:

> I suppose you know about Gtk's Broadway backend, it seems to do its job so a Gtk desktop-app can be a web-app in a very simple way:

Yup, I know about it, but I strive for simplicity in the demos I post and talk about. It may seem like a narrow focus, but one of the reasons I went this way was because I'm terrible at juggling multiple languages/paradigms. It's the reason I decided against using Electron and went for D instead. It's the reason I resist using dub (at least until it's either fixed or replaced). And it's the reason I stick to OOP as much as possible, even though I have yet to learn enough about D's take on OOP for my code to be considered a true application of the paradigm.

My goal is to write X-plat apps in the simplest way possible, using one language  (D) and one toolkit (GTK). The world is complicated enough these days in very many ways and this is how I fight back.

Also, Electron is—to my way of thinking—an indicator that desktop apps are coming back, or at least, holding strong. Why else would they have come up with a way to harness web tools to build them? Electron's very popularity seems like an obvious indicator to me.

But I do appreciate you bringing this up, Antonio, even if I only used it to clarify my stance on all this. :)
January 13
On Friday, 22 November 2019 at 12:14:58 UTC, Ron Tarrant wrote:
> On Friday, 22 November 2019 at 11:05:24 UTC, Antonio Corbi wrote:

> My goal is to write X-plat apps in the simplest way possible, using one language  (D) and one toolkit (GTK). The world is complicated enough these days in very many ways and this is how I fight back.
>

I've just tried broadwayd with a very simple window (only a few widgets in it). Actually it is very straghtforward.

- compile your gtkd program as normally you do.
- run broadwayd in your terminal (broadwayd comes with gtk installation) and keep it open like "broadwayd :2".
- ":2" represents display number, I don't know the things under the hood though.
- run your gtkd program with some extra environment variables:
  GDK_BACKEND=broadway BROADWAY_DISPLAY=:2 ./mygtkdprogram
- open your browser window http://127.0.0.1:9090

I have tested it on Ubuntu 16.04. It is amazing, there is a D program running on my browser and no webassembly involved :D




January 13
On Monday, 13 January 2020 at 13:17:53 UTC, Ferhat Kurtulmuş wrote:

> I've just tried broadwayd with a very simple window (only a few widgets in it). Actually it is very straghtforward.

Well, that's pretty cool, Ferhat.
January 14
On Monday, 13 January 2020 at 13:17:53 UTC, Ferhat Kurtulmuş wrote:

> I've just tried broadwayd with a very simple window (only a few widgets in it). Actually it is very straghtforward.

After further pondering on the implications of this, I'm getting rather excited about where it could go. Have you tried this with a D-app on a remote site? Is that even possible?
January 14
On Tuesday, 14 January 2020 at 10:09:39 UTC, Ron Tarrant wrote:
> On Monday, 13 January 2020 at 13:17:53 UTC, Ferhat Kurtulmuş wrote:
>
>> I've just tried broadwayd with a very simple window (only a few widgets in it). Actually it is very straghtforward.
>
> After further pondering on the implications of this, I'm getting rather excited about where it could go. Have you tried this with a D-app on a remote site? Is that even possible?

No, I did it on my local computer. I also wonder if it can do it on remote. But I read something that it could do it (don't remember where). But I guess one has to deal with some boilerplate code like cookies, local storage etc.
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