April 23, 2012
I wrote a small "bad example" program for a presentation. It calls malloc/free very frequently and I wanted to profile the impact of this compared to a pool allocator solution. Unfortunately I had to notice that the program only runs for a fraction of a second before deadlocking. As it seems the following situation accurs:

1) Thread 1 calls malloc(), and locks the internal malloc mutex
2) Thread 2 triggers garbage collection and stops thread 1
3) Thread 2 is done collecting garbage and calls all destructors. One of these calls free(), as the malloc mutex is still locked by Thread 1 and Thread 1 will never release the mutex, as it is stoped, Thread 2 deadlocks.

Now this is not limited to malloc / free, it can happen with any kind of locking that is done within a destructor.

Currently I can only think of two ways to fix this:

1) Don't use free inside a destructor (goodbye manual memory management)
2) A callback triggered by the GC before it starts stopping any threads, and after it is done destructing all objects to manually lock / unlock necessary synchronization primitives to prevent this kind of deadlocking. The default implementation of this callback should lock / unlock the malloc mutex.

-- 
Kind Regards
Benjamin Thaut
April 23, 2012
Am 23.04.2012 08:41, schrieb Benjamin Thaut:
> I wrote a small "bad example" program for a presentation. It calls
> malloc/free very frequently and I wanted to profile the impact of this
> compared to a pool allocator solution. Unfortunately I had to notice
> that the program only runs for a fraction of a second before
> deadlocking. As it seems the following situation accurs:
>
> 1) Thread 1 calls malloc(), and locks the internal malloc mutex
> 2) Thread 2 triggers garbage collection and stops thread 1
> 3) Thread 2 is done collecting garbage and calls all destructors. One of
> these calls free(), as the malloc mutex is still locked by Thread 1 and
> Thread 1 will never release the mutex, as it is stoped, Thread 2 deadlocks.
>
> Now this is not limited to malloc / free, it can happen with any kind of
> locking that is done within a destructor.
>
> Currently I can only think of two ways to fix this:
>
> 1) Don't use free inside a destructor (goodbye manual memory management)
> 2) A callback triggered by the GC before it starts stopping any threads,
> and after it is done destructing all objects to manually lock / unlock
> necessary synchronization primitives to prevent this kind of
> deadlocking. The default implementation of this callback should lock /
> unlock the malloc mutex.
>
That's nearly the same with OpenGL, never, really never put a glDelete*-Call in a Dtor, I had this for a few commits in glamour (a OpenGL wrapper) and it kept raining Segfaults.
The bigger problem was, that was only caused by the GC, I didn't tell him to collect garbage from another Thread, it happend when it jumped in, and called dtors.
The way I have fixed it was with "scope" and an additional .remove method. Maybe this is the way you can solve your problem.
April 23, 2012
Am 23.04.2012 08:52, schrieb David:
> Am 23.04.2012 08:41, schrieb Benjamin Thaut:
>> I wrote a small "bad example" program for a presentation. It calls
>> malloc/free very frequently and I wanted to profile the impact of this
>> compared to a pool allocator solution. Unfortunately I had to notice
>> that the program only runs for a fraction of a second before
>> deadlocking. As it seems the following situation accurs:
>>
>> 1) Thread 1 calls malloc(), and locks the internal malloc mutex
>> 2) Thread 2 triggers garbage collection and stops thread 1
>> 3) Thread 2 is done collecting garbage and calls all destructors. One of
>> these calls free(), as the malloc mutex is still locked by Thread 1 and
>> Thread 1 will never release the mutex, as it is stoped, Thread 2
>> deadlocks.
>>
>> Now this is not limited to malloc / free, it can happen with any kind of
>> locking that is done within a destructor.
>>
>> Currently I can only think of two ways to fix this:
>>
>> 1) Don't use free inside a destructor (goodbye manual memory management)
>> 2) A callback triggered by the GC before it starts stopping any threads,
>> and after it is done destructing all objects to manually lock / unlock
>> necessary synchronization primitives to prevent this kind of
>> deadlocking. The default implementation of this callback should lock /
>> unlock the malloc mutex.
>>
> That's nearly the same with OpenGL, never, really never put a
> glDelete*-Call in a Dtor, I had this for a few commits in glamour (a
> OpenGL wrapper) and it kept raining Segfaults.
> The bigger problem was, that was only caused by the GC, I didn't tell
> him to collect garbage from another Thread, it happend when it jumped
> in, and called dtors.
> The way I have fixed it was with "scope" and an additional .remove
> method. Maybe this is the way you can solve your problem.

Well the issue with OpenGL is that you can only make OpenGL calls from the thread that actually owns the OpenGL context, so this is not quite the same. Because I'm perfectly allowed to call free from a different thread then where I called malloc. Also this is not only my problem, std.container.Array uses malloc & free so it can happen there too.
April 23, 2012
On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 02:41:21 -0400, Benjamin Thaut <code@benjamin-thaut.de> wrote:

> I wrote a small "bad example" program for a presentation. It calls malloc/free very frequently and I wanted to profile the impact of this compared to a pool allocator solution. Unfortunately I had to notice that the program only runs for a fraction of a second before deadlocking. As it seems the following situation accurs:
>
> 1) Thread 1 calls malloc(), and locks the internal malloc mutex
> 2) Thread 2 triggers garbage collection and stops thread 1
> 3) Thread 2 is done collecting garbage and calls all destructors. One of these calls free(), as the malloc mutex is still locked by Thread 1 and Thread 1 will never release the mutex, as it is stoped, Thread 2 deadlocks.

This shouldn't happen.  The collection routine is specifically designed to avoid this.  I remember when Sean put it into Tango after an IRC conversation.

The correct sequence is:

1. stop the world
2. Perform mark on all data (identifying which blocks should be freed)
3. resume the world
4. Call dtors on unreferenced data and deallocate.

This was to fix the exact problem you are having, albeit the malloc/free were indirect by calls to C-libs.

Please file a bug.

-Steve
April 23, 2012
Am 23.04.2012 13:57, schrieb Steven Schveighoffer:
> On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 02:41:21 -0400, Benjamin Thaut
> <code@benjamin-thaut.de> wrote:
>
>> I wrote a small "bad example" program for a presentation. It calls
>> malloc/free very frequently and I wanted to profile the impact of this
>> compared to a pool allocator solution. Unfortunately I had to notice
>> that the program only runs for a fraction of a second before
>> deadlocking. As it seems the following situation accurs:
>>
>> 1) Thread 1 calls malloc(), and locks the internal malloc mutex
>> 2) Thread 2 triggers garbage collection and stops thread 1
>> 3) Thread 2 is done collecting garbage and calls all destructors. One
>> of these calls free(), as the malloc mutex is still locked by Thread 1
>> and Thread 1 will never release the mutex, as it is stoped, Thread 2
>> deadlocks.
>
> This shouldn't happen. The collection routine is specifically designed
> to avoid this. I remember when Sean put it into Tango after an IRC
> conversation.
>
> The correct sequence is:
>
> 1. stop the world
> 2. Perform mark on all data (identifying which blocks should be freed)
> 3. resume the world
> 4. Call dtors on unreferenced data and deallocate.
>
> This was to fix the exact problem you are having, albeit the malloc/free
> were indirect by calls to C-libs.
>
> Please file a bug.
>
> -Steve

If what you are saying is true, the deadlock must happen somewhere else. This was kind of a assumption because the deadlock happend after I added all the malloc / free calls. Because all the threads are stopped when this happens I can't really debug this, because the Visual Studio debugger tells me that it can not debug any thread but the one that is currently running the GC.

Kind Regards
Ingrater
April 23, 2012
On Monday, 23 April 2012 at 12:11:19 UTC, Benjamin Thaut wrote:
>
> If what you are saying is true, the deadlock must happen somewhere else. This was kind of a assumption because the deadlock happend after I added all the malloc / free calls. Because all the threads are stopped when this happens I can't really debug this, because the Visual Studio debugger tells me that it can not debug any thread but the one that is currently running the GC.
>
> Kind Regards
> Ingrater

Are these threads created by core.thread.Thread, or are they created through different means such as native OS calls or a C api? If the latter, you have to register them with the runtime (I think it was something like Thread.attachThis), otherwise issues like this will happen.
April 23, 2012
On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 08:36:59 -0400, Kapps <opantm2+spam@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Monday, 23 April 2012 at 12:11:19 UTC, Benjamin Thaut wrote:
>>
>> If what you are saying is true, the deadlock must happen somewhere else. This was kind of a assumption because the deadlock happend after I added all the malloc / free calls. Because all the threads are stopped when this happens I can't really debug this, because the Visual Studio debugger tells me that it can not debug any thread but the one that is currently running the GC.
>>
>> Kind Regards
>> Ingrater
>
> Are these threads created by core.thread.Thread, or are they created through different means such as native OS calls or a C api? If the latter, you have to register them with the runtime (I think it was something like Thread.attachThis), otherwise issues like this will happen.

No.  Dtor calls should all be done while all threads are running.  The portion of the GC collection cycle which requires the world to be stopped should not be doing any locking/unlocking in arbitrary C libs.  If it is, it's a bug.

-Steve
April 23, 2012
Am 23.04.2012 14:36, schrieb Kapps:
> On Monday, 23 April 2012 at 12:11:19 UTC, Benjamin Thaut wrote:
>>
>> If what you are saying is true, the deadlock must happen somewhere
>> else. This was kind of a assumption because the deadlock happend after
>> I added all the malloc / free calls. Because all the threads are
>> stopped when this happens I can't really debug this, because the
>> Visual Studio debugger tells me that it can not debug any thread but
>> the one that is currently running the GC.
>>
>> Kind Regards
>> Ingrater
>
> Are these threads created by core.thread.Thread, or are they created
> through different means such as native OS calls or a C api? If the
> latter, you have to register them with the runtime (I think it was
> something like Thread.attachThis), otherwise issues like this will happen.

No all threads are created via core.thread.Thread. There are however some threads (OpenGL / OpenAL) that I do not create.
April 23, 2012
On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 15:44:01 +0200, Benjamin Thaut <code@benjamin-thaut.de> wrote:

> Am 23.04.2012 14:36, schrieb Kapps:
>> On Monday, 23 April 2012 at 12:11:19 UTC, Benjamin Thaut wrote:
>>>
>>> If what you are saying is true, the deadlock must happen somewhere
>>> else. This was kind of a assumption because the deadlock happend after
>>> I added all the malloc / free calls. Because all the threads are
>>> stopped when this happens I can't really debug this, because the
>>> Visual Studio debugger tells me that it can not debug any thread but
>>> the one that is currently running the GC.
>>>
>>> Kind Regards
>>> Ingrater
>>
>> Are these threads created by core.thread.Thread, or are they created
>> through different means such as native OS calls or a C api? If the
>> latter, you have to register them with the runtime (I think it was
>> something like Thread.attachThis), otherwise issues like this will happen.
>
> No all threads are created via core.thread.Thread. There are however some threads (OpenGL / OpenAL) that I do not create.

I've had problems using attachThis() on threads created in C.
Look at http://www.digitalmars.com/d/archives/digitalmars/D/learn/GC_collecting_too_much_.._33934.html
No one has answered though..
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