September 03, 2008
You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome browser.
Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/, Windows only for now).

It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.

You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
September 03, 2008
Denis Koroskin:

Beware that it installs some kind of resident shit, that you have to hunt down using spyware-removal programs, in three different directories, that runs at the startup and pings home, and doesn't get removed after the uninstall. So beside having a really fast JavaScript interpreter (about 20 times faster than the one of Firefox 2) it's a kind of virus.

Bye,
bearophile
September 03, 2008
Denis Koroskin wrote:
> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome browser.
> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/, Windows only for now).
> 
> It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
> 
> You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
> 
> This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads..

I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The website-application feature is also a very handy thing.

Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would love having a D port. :P
September 03, 2008
在 Wed, 03 Sep 2008 22:08:27 +0800,Alexander Panek <alexander.panek@brainsware.org> 写道:

> Denis Koroskin wrote:
>> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome browser.
>> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/, Windows only for now).
>>  It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
>>  You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
>>  This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
>
> It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads..
>
> I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The website-application feature is also a very handy thing.
>
> Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would love having a D port. :P

Who will ever want to port a such big project? 437MB Source tarball(WTF, a browser bigger than OS source base)

Google goes the wrong way. It just extends the current web crap not reinvent something smarter.


-- 
使用 Opera 革命性的电子邮件客户程序: http://www.opera.com/mail/
September 03, 2008
Alexander Panek wrote:
> Denis Koroskin wrote:
>> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
>> browser.
>> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
>> Windows only for now).
>>
>> It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
>>
>> You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
>>
>> This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
> 
> It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads..
> 
> I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The website-application feature is also a very handy thing.

I'd like it better if it had the Safari-like progress meter in the
location bar.  IE/FF/Chrome just have a spinning device... so does that
mean I can expect it to take an infinitely long time to load and render?
 Safari at least shows how close to completion it is with the finite
progress bar.  For some pages it's really nice to see how far it gets
before hanging up.  It helps in diagnostics, too.



September 03, 2008
Denis Koroskin wrote:
> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome browser.
> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/, Windows only for now).
> 
> It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
> 
> You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
> 
> This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's probably worth mentioning that IE has offered an option to make each window its own process for as long as I can remember.  That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway.


Sean
September 03, 2008
Sean Kelly wrote:
> Denis Koroskin wrote:
>> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
>> browser.
>> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
>> Windows only for now).
>>
>> It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
>>
>> You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
>>
>> This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
> 
> It's probably worth mentioning that IE has offered an option to make each window its own process for as long as I can remember.  That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway.

Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only, not Internet Explorer.  I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old Explorer).  Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been doing anything special along those lines.



September 03, 2008
Chris R. Miller wrote:
> Sean Kelly wrote:
>> Denis Koroskin wrote:
>>> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
>>> browser.
>>> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
>>> Windows only for now).
>>>
>>> It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
>>> window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
>>> crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
>>> nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening
>>> youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
>>>
>>> You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
>>>
>>> This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
>>> what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
>> It's probably worth mentioning that IE has offered an option to make
>> each window its own process for as long as I can remember.  That said,
>> the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a
>> platform" is ever going to make headway.
> 
> Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only,
> not Internet Explorer.  I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and
> didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old
> Explorer).  Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been
> doing anything special along those lines.
> 

Internet Explorer 8 has tabs-as-processes and windows as processes. 7- work like traditional browsers.
September 03, 2008
Chris R. Miller wrote:
> Sean Kelly wrote:
>> Denis Koroskin wrote:
>>> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
>>> browser.
>>> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
>>> Windows only for now).
>>>
>>> It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
>>> window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
>>> crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
>>> nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening
>>> youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
>>>
>>> You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
>>>
>>> This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
>>> what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
>> It's probably worth mentioning that IE has offered an option to make
>> each window its own process for as long as I can remember.  That said,
>> the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a
>> platform" is ever going to make headway.
> 
> Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only,
> not Internet Explorer.  I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and
> didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old
> Explorer).  Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been
> doing anything special along those lines.

Huh... I could have sworn there was an IE setting for this.  Ah well.


Sean
September 03, 2008
Robert Fraser wrote:
> Chris R. Miller wrote:
>> Sean Kelly wrote:
>>> Denis Koroskin wrote:
>>>> You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
>>>> browser.
>>>> Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
>>>> Windows only for now).
>>>>
>>>> It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
>>>>
>>>> You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
>>>>
>>>> This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
>>> It's probably worth mentioning that IE has offered an option to make each window its own process for as long as I can remember.  That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway.
>>
>> Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only, not Internet Explorer.  I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old Explorer).  Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been doing anything special along those lines.
> 
> Internet Explorer 8 has tabs-as-processes and windows as processes. 7- work like traditional browsers.

Interesting.  I hope they kept the memory use down.  I warmed up IE7 from a five-month period of inactivity and used Chrome to monitor its memory use.  I opened up the same pages as I had in Chrome (with the exception of the memory window) and found IE to use less memory by almost 15 MB.  Then again, I had been using Chrome for a while, and it was a fresh instance of IE.  But a 15MB disparity I didn't think I could resolve by restarting Chrome.



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