Jump to page: 1 2
Thread overview
Forward referencing functions in D
5 days ago
wilcro
5 days ago
Adam D. Ruppe
5 days ago
Imperatorn
5 days ago
H. S. Teoh
5 days ago
H. S. Teoh
5 days ago
wilcro
5 days ago
Ali Çehreli
4 days ago
NonNull
4 days ago
Ali Çehreli
5 days ago
wilcro
5 days ago
The web page "Programming in D for C Programmers" (https://dlang.org/articles/ctod.html#forwardfunc) states that forward declarations are neither required nor permitted, and that the following construct is allowable:

void myfunc()
{
    forwardfunc();
}

void forwardfunc()
{
    ... //do stuff
}


However, the following code will cause a compiler error:

import std.stdio: writeln;

void main()
{

    void myfunc() {

        forwardfunc(); // onlineapp.d(8): Error: undefined identifier forwardfunc
    }

    void forwardfunc() {

        writeln("foo");
    }

    myfunc();

}


Evidently, I am misunderstanding something very elemental here; thanks for any enlightenment regarding this.
5 days ago
On Friday, 16 October 2020 at 19:55:53 UTC, wilcro wrote:
> Evidently, I am misunderstanding something very elemental here; thanks for any enlightenment regarding this.

Inside a function things happen in order, top to bottom, including declarations (you can only access local variables after they are declared, and nested functions work like local variables).

In a declaration, order is less important.

For recursive nested functions it can sometimes help to put a declaration inside a function:

void main() {
  // order matters here, in function
   struct Holder {
       // order doesn't matter in here, in decl
    }
  // order matters again since functions run in sequence
}
5 days ago
On Friday, 16 October 2020 at 19:55:53 UTC, wilcro wrote:
> The web page "Programming in D for C Programmers" (https://dlang.org/articles/ctod.html#forwardfunc) states that forward declarations are neither required nor permitted, and that the following construct is allowable:
>
> void myfunc()
> {
>     forwardfunc();
> }
>
> void forwardfunc()
> {
>     ... //do stuff
> }
>
>
> However, the following code will cause a compiler error:
>
> import std.stdio: writeln;
>
> void main()
> {
>
>     void myfunc() {
>
>         forwardfunc(); // onlineapp.d(8): Error: undefined identifier forwardfunc
>     }
>
>     void forwardfunc() {
>
>         writeln("foo");
>     }
>
>     myfunc();
>
> }
>
>
> Evidently, I am misunderstanding something very elemental here; thanks for any enlightenment regarding this.

I think it might be just because you havent defined the function yet at that point.
5 days ago
On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 07:55:53PM +0000, wilcro via Digitalmars-d-learn wrote:
> The web page "Programming in D for C Programmers" (https://dlang.org/articles/ctod.html#forwardfunc) states that forward declarations are neither required nor permitted,
[...]
> However, the following code will cause a compiler error:
[...]
> void main()
> {
> 
>     void myfunc() {
> 
>         forwardfunc(); // onlineapp.d(8): Error: undefined identifier
> forwardfunc
>     }
> 
>     void forwardfunc() {
> 
>         writeln("foo");
>     }
[...]

This is because order-independence of declarations only applies to module scope, not to function scope.  So the above would work if myfunc and forwardfunc were moved outside of main().  But inside a function body, you must declare everything before you use them.


T

-- 
Philosophy: how to make a career out of daydreaming.
5 days ago
On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 08:04:07PM +0000, Imperatorn via Digitalmars-d-learn wrote: [...]
> I think it might be just because you havent defined the function yet at that point.

That's not correct; the following works:

	module mymodule;

	void func() {
		forwardfunc();
	}

	void forwardfunc() {
	}

However, this only applies in module scope. If they were declared inside a function body, forwardfunc must be declared before func.


T

-- 
It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. -- Sammy
5 days ago
On Friday, 16 October 2020 at 19:55:53 UTC, wilcro wrote:
> The web page "Programming in D for C Programmers" (https://dlang.org/articles/ctod.html#forwardfunc) states that forward declarations are neither required nor permitted, and that the following construct is allowable:
>
> void myfunc()
> {
>     forwardfunc();
> }
>
> void forwardfunc()
> {
>     ... //do stuff
> }
>
>
> However, the following code will cause a compiler error:
>
> import std.stdio: writeln;
>
> void main()
> {
>
>     void myfunc() {
>
>         forwardfunc(); // onlineapp.d(8): Error: undefined identifier forwardfunc
>     }
>
>     void forwardfunc() {
>
>         writeln("foo");
>     }
>
>     myfunc();
>
> }
>
>
> Evidently, I am misunderstanding something very elemental here; thanks for any enlightenment regarding this.



Thanks to all for your responses; as a related followup question, would there be any reason to avoid placing the majority of code for a program outside of the main function?
5 days ago
On 10/16/20 1:47 PM, wilcro wrote:

> would
> there be any reason to avoid placing the majority of code for a program
> outside of the main function?

Keeping scopes of symbols as small as possible is a general guideline in D and elsewhere but I wouldn't crowd my main() function with details of program logic either. (Aside: There is no global name scope in D; everything belongs to a module.)

One thing I love about D is that there are no strong principles like that. I code in a way that is comfortable and change things later on as a needs arise. :)

Ali

5 days ago
On 10/16/20 4:47 PM, wilcro wrote:

> 
> Thanks to all for your responses; as a related followup question, would there be any reason to avoid placing the majority of code for a program outside of the main function?

Inner functions have benefits:

1. They are only accessible inside the function. Which means you only have to worry about correctness while INSIDE that function.
2. inner functions have access to the outer function's stack frame.

Often, I use inner functions to factor out a common piece of code that I don't want to have to write multiple times in the same function.

-Steve
5 days ago
On Friday, 16 October 2020 at 19:55:53 UTC, wilcro wrote:
> The web page "Programming in D for C Programmers" (https://dlang.org/articles/ctod.html#forwardfunc) states that forward declarations are neither required nor permitted, and that the following construct is allowable:
>
> void myfunc()
> {
>     forwardfunc();
> }
>
> void forwardfunc()
> {
>     ... //do stuff
> }
>
>
> However, the following code will cause a compiler error:
>
> import std.stdio: writeln;
>
> void main()
> {
>
>     void myfunc() {
>
>         forwardfunc(); // onlineapp.d(8): Error: undefined identifier forwardfunc
>     }
>
>     void forwardfunc() {
>
>         writeln("foo");
>     }
>
>     myfunc();
>
> }
>
>
> Evidently, I am misunderstanding something very elemental here; thanks for any enlightenment regarding this.




Thanks for your insights, Ali and Steve -- very helpful.
4 days ago
On Friday, 16 October 2020 at 21:28:18 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer wrote:
> Inner functions have benefits:
>
> 1. They are only accessible inside the function. Which means you only have to worry about correctness while INSIDE that function.
> 2. inner functions have access to the outer function's stack frame.
>
> Often, I use inner functions to factor out a common piece of code that I don't want to have to write multiple times in the same function.
>
> -Steve

How can you write two inner functions that call each other? (Recursively)
« First   ‹ Prev
1 2